PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How can I prevent indigestion?

ANSWER

The best way to avoid getting it is to steer clear of the foods and situations that seem to cause it. You can keep a food diary to figure out what you eat that gives you trouble. Other ways to prevent the problem include:

  • Eat small meals so your stomach doesn’t have to work as hard or as long.
  • Eat slowly.
  • Avoid foods with a lot of acid, such as citrus fruits and tomatoes.
  • Limit spicy foods
  • Limit fried and greasy foods
  • Cut back on or avoid foods and drinks that have caffeine.
  • If stress is a trigger, learn new ways to manage it, such as relaxation and biofeedback techniques.
  • If you smoke, quit -- or at least, don’t light up right before or after you eat, since smoking can irritate your stomach.
  • Cut back on alcohol.
  • Avoid wearing tight-fitting clothes. They can put pressure on your stomach, which can make the food you’ve eaten move up into your esophagus.
  • Don't exercise with a full stomach. Do it before a meal or at least 1 hour after you eat.
  • Don't lie down right after you’ve eaten.
  • Wait at least 3 hours after your last meal of the day before you go to bed.
  • Raise the top of your bed so that your head and chest are higher than your feet. You can do this by placing 6-inch blocks under the top bedposts. Don't use piles of pillows to achieve the same goal. You’ll only put your head at an angle that can increase pressure on your stomach and make heartburn worse.

From: Indigestion WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National Institutes of Health. 

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse.

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

SOURCES: 

National Institutes of Health. 

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse.

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

When should I call the doctor about indigestion?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.