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What are some side effects of beta-blockers?

ANSWER

When you're taking a beta-blocker, you may:

You could also have:

Let your doctor know if any of these bother you a lot. He may change your dose or switch you to a different medicine.

A beta-blocker might raise your triglycerides and lower your "good" HDL cholesterol a bit for a little while.

Don't stop taking your beta-blocker unless your doctor says it's OK. That could raise your chance of a heart attack or other heart problems.

  • Feel drained of energy
  • Have cold hands and feet
  • Be dizzy
  • Gain weight
  • Trouble sleeping or vivid dreams
  • Swelling in your hands, feet, and ankles
  • Shortness of breath, wheezing, or other breathing problems
  • Depression

Mayo Clinic: "High blood pressure (hypertension): Beta blockers."

American Heart Association: "Types of Blood Pressure Medications."

Texas Heart Institute: "Beta-Blockers."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 02, 2017

Mayo Clinic: "High blood pressure (hypertension): Beta blockers."

American Heart Association: "Types of Blood Pressure Medications."

Texas Heart Institute: "Beta-Blockers."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 02, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

When can I stop taking beta-blockers to help high blood pressure?

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