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Who shouldn't take beta-blockers to help high blood pressure?

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Beta-blockers may not work as well for older people and for African-Americans.

Doctors don't usually prescribe them for people with asthma, COPD, or breathing trouble or for those with very low blood pressure (hypotension), a type of heart rhythm problem called a heart block, or a slow pulse (bradycardia). Beta-blockers can make symptoms of these conditions worse.

These drugs can hide signs of low blood sugar. You'll have to check your blood sugar more often when you have diabetes.

They may not be safe for women who are planning a pregnancy, pregnant, or breastfeeding. Tell your doctor right away if you get pregnant while you're taking a beta-blocker.

Mayo Clinic: "High blood pressure (hypertension): Beta blockers."

American Heart Association: "Types of Blood Pressure Medications."

Texas Heart Institute: "Beta-Blockers."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 02, 2017

Mayo Clinic: "High blood pressure (hypertension): Beta blockers."

American Heart Association: "Types of Blood Pressure Medications."

Texas Heart Institute: "Beta-Blockers."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 02, 2017

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What are some side effects of beta-blockers?

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