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How is bronchitis spread?

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You get acute bronchitis the same way you get cold and flu viruses: by getting a virus inside your body, usually by breathing it in or passing it from your hands to your mouth, nose, or eyes. Viruses get into the air and onto surfaces after someone who is sick coughs, blows their nose, sneezes, or sometimes even just breathes.

To keep from getting bronchitis, try not to be in close contact with people who have cold or flu-like symptoms. Wash your hands regularly, and don’t touch your eyes, mouth, or nose.

The flu can cause bronchitis. That’s why it’s smart to get your flu shot every year.

If you have bronchitis, cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze and cough, and wash your hands often to avoid getting someone else sick.

From: Is Bronchitis Contagious? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Lung Association: “Preventing Acute Bronchitis;” “Acute bronchitis;” and “Understanding Chronic Bronchitis.”

CDC: “Bronchitis (Chest Cold).”

Michael Benninger, MD, chairman, Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic.

National Health Service/UK.Gov: “How Long Is Someone Contagious After a Viral Infection?”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on February 09, 2017

SOURCES:

American Lung Association: “Preventing Acute Bronchitis;” “Acute bronchitis;” and “Understanding Chronic Bronchitis.”

CDC: “Bronchitis (Chest Cold).”

Michael Benninger, MD, chairman, Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic.

National Health Service/UK.Gov: “How Long Is Someone Contagious After a Viral Infection?”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on February 09, 2017

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When should I see a doctor about bronchitis?

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