0 0
  • Answer 1/12

    What's the difference between antiperspirant and deodorant?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Deodorants simply fight or mask odor, kind of like perfume. Antiperspirants have metals such as aluminum that block your sweat glands for a while. Many products on the market are a combination of antiperspirant and deodorant, which means they help with both moisture and odor. 

  • Question 1/12

    To keep sweat at bay, it’s best put on antiperspirant:

  • Answer 1/12

    To keep sweat at bay, it’s best put on antiperspirant:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most people put antiperspirant on in the morning after they shower. While that's OK, you're probably more active early in the day, so it might not have enough time to soak into your sweat glands and give you good protection. If you're only going to put it on once a day, do it before bed .But using antiperspirant twice a day -- before you go to sleep and in the morning -- has been proven to work best.

  • Question 1/12

    You should only put antiperspirant under your arms.

  • Answer 1/12

    You should only put antiperspirant under your arms.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s perfectly fine to use it on most parts of your body where you tend to get sweaty, like your feet or hairline. (Stay away from sensitive areas, like your eyes and genitals.) Spray antiperspirant is a good choice for sweaty feet, or you might try antiperspirant wipes if you need to cover large areas of your body.

  • Question 1/12

    Research shows that antiperspirants may be linked to:

  • Answer 1/12

    Research shows that antiperspirants may be linked to:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There's no scientific evidence that people who use antiperspirant are more likely to have these conditions. If you'd like to play it extra safe, though, you can try one of the aluminum-free deodorants on the market.  

  • Question 1/12

    Men sweat more than women.

  • Answer 1/12

    Men sweat more than women.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Researchers from Australia studied how much people sweat and found that body size, rather than gender, matters most. Generally speaking, women are smaller than men, so they tend to sweat less. But a woman who's 5-foot-10 and weighs 200 pounds would probably sweat more than a man who's 5-foot-8 and weighs 150 pounds. 

  • Question 1/12

    The natural scent of sweat is:

  • Answer 1/12

    The natural scent of sweat is:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Sweat by itself doesn't stink. That changes when it mixes with the bacteria made by the glands in your underarms and groin. If you were only to sweat on your back, for example, you probably wouldn't notice an odor.

  • Answer 1/12

    Sweat can be:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It's rare, but it happens. It’s a condition called chromhidrosis, and it's caused by too much pigment (the substance that gives something a particular color) in your sweat glands. Another sweat-related condition is called hyperhidrosis. It's when you sweat too much -- up to 4 or 5 times more than most people.   

  • Question 1/12

    Which of the following can cause a lot of sweating?

  • Answer 1/12

    Which of the following can cause a lot of sweating?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Diabetes, an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism), frostbite, head trauma, obesity, and menopause can all lead to excessive sweating, too. If you've recently started sweating a lot more and aren't sure why, talk to your doctor about it. 

  • Question 1/12

    What may help you sweat less?

  • Answer 1/12

    What may help you sweat less?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    For some people, over-the-counter antiperspirants and regular showers just don't cut it. If that’s true for you, a number of treatments can help. The options include prescription-strength antiperspirant, medication, iontophoresis (mild electrical currents run through water), microwave energy treatments, lasers, Botox, and surgery to take out some sweat glands.

  • Answer 1/12

    Botox helps you sweat less by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s used to treat severe sweating in your underarms. Your doctor gives you shots under your arms that block the chemical that tells your sweat glands to turn on. This has been shown to lessen sweating by at least 82% and can last 4 to 12 months or longer.

  • Question 1/12

    Which of these make some people sweat?

  • Answer 1/12

    Which of these make some people sweat?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Hot foods, both spicy and temperature-wise, can cause it. Some people sweat when they eat any type of food, a rare condition called gustatory sweating or Frey's syndrome.

  • Question 1/12

    Night sweats may be caused by:

  • Answer 1/12

    Night sweats may be caused by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many meds, including diabetes drugs, can cause night sweats, as can anxiety, autoimmune disorders, and infections. They usually aren't dangerous, though rarely they can be a sign of cancer or stroke. To find out why you're having night sweats, talk with your doctor, especially if you also have unexplained weight loss, diarrhea, pain, or other unusual symptoms.

  • Your Score:

    Share your score:
    0
    Share your score:
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    No sweat! You aced this!

    Results:

    Can you keep your cool? Mostly, but you missed a few.

    Results:

    You're in a sticky situation. Study up on sweat and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on April 10, 2018 Medically Reviewed on April 10, 2018

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on
April 10, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

  1. Getty

 

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Alzheimer's Myths."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Hyperhidrosis."

American Cancer Society: "Antiperspirants and Breast Cancer Risk."

American College of Sports Medicine: "The Science of Sweat."

CosmeticInfo.org (Personal Care Products Council): "Antiperspirants and Deodorants."

Experimental Physiology: "Variations in Body Morphology Explain Sex Differences in Thermoeffector Function During Compensable Heat stress."

Indiana University Health: "Sweat: 5 Things You Didn't Know."

International Hyperhidrosis Society: "Chromhidrosis," "Defining Hyperhidrosis," "Gustatory Sweating (Frey's Syndrome)," "Hyperhidrosis Treatment Overview," "OnabotulinumtoxinA Injections (Botox)," "Tips for Best Results­-OTC," "Two Types of Hyperhidrosis," "Understanding Sweating."

Mayo Clinic: "Night Sweats," "Sweating and Body Odor."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

NEXT IN THE SERIES

From WebMD