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  • Question 1/7

    Your nicotine withdrawal symptoms will probably last ... 

  • Answer 1/7

    Your nicotine withdrawal symptoms will probably last ... 

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Nicotine withdrawal isn’t fun, but it’s short. For most people, the worst of it is over within a few days or weeks. To be ready, you may want to use nicotine replacement therapy, which can help control your cravings and help you succeed in kicking the habit for good.

  • Question 1/7

    Nicotine is natural.

  • Answer 1/7

    Nicotine is natural.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s in tobacco leaves. But that doesn’t mean nicotine is safe. It’s a big part of how people get addicted to cigarettes and other tobacco products. Nicotine will nudge your body to make more adrenaline, so your heart rate speeds up, your blood pressure rises, and you breathe faster.

  • Answer 1/7

    How much nicotine do e-cigarettes have?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You might think they’re less addictive than regular cigarettes. Not so fast! Nearly all e-cigarettes, even some of those that claim to be nicotine-free, contain the drug. It can be hard to know how much nicotine you’ll get, because the amount varies and doesn’t always match what’s on the label.

  • Question 1/7

    Smokeless tobacco products like dip and chew are safer than cigarettes.

  • Answer 1/7

    Smokeless tobacco products like dip and chew are safer than cigarettes.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can get hooked on these products. Keeping an average-sized wad of dip in your mouth for 30 minutes gives you as much nicotine as smoking four cigarettes.

  • Question 1/7

    When you quit nicotine, your appetite ...

  • Answer 1/7

    When you quit nicotine, your appetite ...

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    • Correct Answer:

    Nicotine curbs your appetite. Many people find that when they kick the habit, they’re hungrier than usual. It can also make you feel stressed, depressed, or anxious while you’re detoxing off nicotine. So try to trade one bad habit (smoking) for better ones. Some ideas: Take a walk when you want to light up and reach for something healthy, like fruit and a handful of nuts, instead of a candy bar when you want a snack.

  • Question 1/7

    Nicotine causes lung cancer.

  • Answer 1/7

    Nicotine causes lung cancer.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It will get you addicted to tobacco. But the most serious health problems from cigarettes, such as lung cancer, emphysema, and heart disease, are due to some of the many other toxic chemicals present in tobacco and tobacco smoke. These include formaldehyde, cyanide, ammonia, and tar.

  • Question 1/7

    You get addicted to nicotine because of how it affects your:

  • Answer 1/7

    You get addicted to nicotine because of how it affects your:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When you smoke a cigarette, the nicotine enters your bloodstream through your lungs. From there, it takes just a few seconds for the drug to reach your brain. It then opens the floodgates for more adrenaline and ramps up levels of a feel-good brain chemical called dopamine. No wonder it’s hard to quit!

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Great job! You’re ready to nix nicotine for good.

    Results:

    OK. Now that you know the real deal on nicotine, you’re ready to put this addiction behind you.

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    Not so good. But now you know better about what nicotine really does.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on September 05, 2018 Medically Reviewed on September 05, 2018

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
September 05, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

NIDA for Teens: “Tobacco, Nicotine, & E-Cigarettes.”

Jiloha, R. Indian Journal of Psychiatry , October-December 2010.

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “Drugfacts: Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products.”

Benowitz, N. New England Journal of Medicine , June 17, 2010.

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Nicotine Dependence: Signs and Symptoms.”

Seely, R. Nature , July 14, 2011.

CDC: “Withdrawal.”

American Lung Association: “E-cigarettes and Lung Health.”

News release, FDA.

Cameron, J. Tobacco Control , 2014.

FDA: “FDA 101: Smoking Cessation Products.”

Stead, L. Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews , November 2012.

National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens: “Tobacco, Nicotine, and E-Cigarettes.”

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “What are the medical consequences of tobacco use?”

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: “Nicotine Addiction and Your Health.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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