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Chronic Kidney Disease

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What Happens

At first with chronic kidney disease, your kidneys are still able to regulate the balance of fluids, salts, and waste products in your body. But as kidney function decreases, you will start to have other problems, or complications. The worse your kidney function gets, the more complications you'll have and the more severe they will be.

When kidney function falls below a certain point, it is called kidney failure. Kidney failure has harmful effects throughout your body. It can cause serious heart, bone, and brain problems and make you feel very ill.

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Understanding Kidney Disease -- Symptoms

Early detection is the first step in treating chronic kidney disease. The symptoms of kidney disease may include: Nausea and vomiting Passing only small amounts of urine Swelling, particularly of the ankles, and puffiness around the eyes Unpleasant taste in the mouth and urine-like odor to the breath Persistent fatigue or shortness of breath Loss of appetite Increasingly higher blood pressure Muscle cramps, especially in the legs Pale skin Excessiv...

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After you have kidney failure, either you will need to have dialysis or you will need a new kidney. Both choices have risks and benefits.

Complications of chronic kidney disease

  • AnemiaAnemia. You may feel weak, have pale skin, and feel tired, because the kidneys can't produce enough of the hormone (erythropoietin) needed to make new red blood cells.
  • Electrolyte imbalanceElectrolyte imbalance. When the kidneys can't filter out certain chemicals, such as potassium, phosphate, and acids, you may have an irregular heartbeat, muscle weakness, and other problems.
  • Uremic syndromeUremic syndrome. You may be tired, have nausea and vomiting, not have an appetite, or not be able to sleep when substances build up in your blood. The substances can be poisonous (toxic) if they reach high levels. This syndrome can affect many parts of your body, including the intestines, nerves, and heart.
  • Heart disease. Chronic kidney disease speeds up hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) and increases the risk of stroke, heart attack, and heart failure. Heart disease is the most common cause of death in people with kidney failure.
  • Bone disease (osteodystrophy). Abnormal levels of substances, such as calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D, can lead to bone disease.
  • Fluid buildup (edema). As kidney function gets worse, fluids and salt build up in the body. Fluid buildup can lead to heart failure and pulmonary edema.
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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: November 14, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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