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Hip Injuries, Age 11 and Younger

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Home Treatment

Home treatment may help relieve your child's hip pain, swelling, and stiffness. If your child will cooperate, use the following tips. If your child becomes upset or will not cooperate, do not force your child.

  • Rest. Have your child rest and protect the sore hip. Have your child stop, change, or take a break from any activity that may be causing pain or soreness.
  • Ice will help your child's pain and swelling. Put ice or cold packs on the sore area immediately. Put ice on for 20 minutes out of every hour and do this 4 or more times in the first 1 to 2 days. If your child is cooperative, use the ice often. If your child is not cooperative, use the ice as much as you can without struggling with your child. Wrap the ice in a wet towel. Do not put the ice right on the skin. Take the ice off if your child falls asleep.
  • Place your child on the uninjured side for sleep.
  • Gently massage or rub your child's hip to relieve pain and encourage blood flow.
  • For the first 1 to 2 days after an injury, do not let your child do things that may increase swelling, such as taking hot showers, using hot tubs, or using hot packs.
  • After 2 to 3 days, if the swelling is gone, heat can be put on the hip. Your child can carefully begin normal activities. Moist heat with a hot water bottle or warm towel may feel good to your child.
Medicine you can buy without a prescription
Try a nonprescription medicine to help treat your child's fever or pain:

Talk to your child's doctor before switching back and forth between doses of acetaminophen and ibuprofen. When you switch between two medicines, there is a chance your child will get too much medicine.

Safety tips
Be sure to follow these safety tips when you use a nonprescription medicine:
  • Carefully read and follow all labels on the medicine bottle and box.
  • Give, but do not exceed, the maximum recommended doses.
  • Do not give your child a medicine if he or she has had an allergic reaction to it in the past.
  • Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than age 20 unless directed to do so by your child's doctor.
  • Do not give naproxen (such as Aleve) to children younger than age 12 unless your child's doctor tells you to.
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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: January 30, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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