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ADD & ADHD Health Center

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Adult ADHD and Exercise

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ADHD doesn't only affect children. Adults can have this condition, too.

ADHD can make it hard for adults to pay attention, control their emotions, and finish tasks.

Just like kids, adults with ADHD are often given stimulants or other medications to control symptoms. They may also have therapy sessions to help get organized and stay focused.

One ADHD treatment that doesn't require a prescription or a visit to a therapist's office is exercise. Research is finding that getting regular fitness can improve thinking ability, and it may improve the symptoms of adult ADHD.

Exercise and the Brain

Exercise isn't just good for shedding fat and toning muscles. It can help keep the brain in better shape, too.

When you exercise, your brain releases chemicals called neurotransmitters, including dopamine, which helps with attention and clear thinking. People with ADHD often have less dopamine than usual in their brain.

The stimulant medicines that are often used to treat adult ADHD work by increasing the availability of dopamine in the brain. So it makes sense that a workout can have many of the same effects as stimulant drugs.

Fitness can have the following benefits for adults with ADHD:

  • Ease stress and anxiety.
  • Improve impulse control and reduce compulsive behavior.
  • Enhance working memory.
  • Improve executive function. That's the set of skills needed to plan, organize, and remember details.
  • Increase levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. That's a protein involved in learning and memory. It's in short supply in people with ADHD.

More Reasons to Exercise

Beyond helping with ADHD symptoms, exercise has several other benefits. Getting regular workouts can help you:

How Often Should You Exercise?

Health experts recommend that you get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise a week. That works out to about 30 minutes of fitness a day, five days a week.

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