Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier
WebMD

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started
My Medicine
WebMD

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion
    WebMD

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community
    WebMD

    Community

    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Back Pain Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Back Pain Dos and Don'ts

By
WebMD Feature

Back pain is the most commonly reported pain condition in America. About 59 million Americans have had a recent episode of back pain, and about 80% of all people will have back pain at some time.

Whether you already struggle with back pain or are trying to prevent back trouble, there are dozens of opportunities in your daily routine for you to protect your back -- or put it at risk.

Recommended Related to Back Pain

Low Back Strain

Low back pain is a fact of life. Just about everybody will suffer from it sooner or later. One of the main causes of back pain, whether acute or chronic, is low back strain. So what is low back strain? A series of muscles and ligaments in your back hold the bones of your spinal column in place. You can strain these muscles by stretching them too far, causing tiny tears in the tissue. The muscles are then weakened, so they may not be able to hold the bones of your spinal column in place correctly...

Read the Low Back Strain article > >

Help Your Back in Bed

You spend about a third of your life sleeping. One of the best ways to protect your back is with a mattress and sleep positions that support it, says Lauren Polivka, PT, DPT, a physical therapist at Balance Gym in Washington, D.C. “If you don’t have the right support system, you can set yourself up for injury.”

Make bedtime a haven for your back by:

  • Getting the right mattress. No matter how comfortable a squishy-soft feather bed may seem at first, a firmer mattress is usually the best for your back, Polivka says. “The types of beds where partners can choose a different level of support can be good, because differences in body structure and size can make what’s comfortable for one person different from another.”
  • Keep your bed in shape. If you’re waking up stiff and sore, check your mattress. How long has it been since you replaced it? “It’s the same as with running shoes: you put a lot of pressure on the mattress and deforming the foam over time,” Polivka explains. Twice a year, flip the mattress over and check for divots, dents, wear and tear and breakage. If there are spots where the mattress isn’t springing back the way it used to, it’s time to spring for a new one. Consumer Reports recommends that you consider changing your mattress if yours is at more than 5 to 7 years old.
  • Sleep smart. The worst sleep position for your back? On your stomach. “It puts your neck in a more extended, rotated position -- because you can’t sleep face down -- and that puts the most strain on your joints,” Polivka explains.

Instead, sleep either on your side or your back, using pillows for support. If you prefer your side, the best aid is a body pillow that can support your weight between your knees and help align your arms. Back sleepers should put a pillow between their knees.

  • Rising and shining. Do you jump (or roll grumpily) out of bed when the alarm clock rings? Don’t. Instead, take a minute to stretch fully and let your body wake up before getting a move on. This can help prevent injuries, Polivka says.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Today on WebMD

Woman holding lower back
Or is it another form of back pain?
Hand on back
See the myths vs. the facts.
 
Woman doing pilates
Good and bad exercises.
acupuncture needles in woman's back
Use it to manage your pain.
 
Man with enhanced spinal column, rear view
Video
pain in brain and nerves
Slideshow
 
Chronic Pain Healtcheck
Health Check
break at desk
Article
 
Woman holding lower back
Slideshow
Weight Loss Surgery
Slideshow
 
lumbar spine
Slideshow
back pain
Article