Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Health & Balance

Font Size
A
A
A

Alternative Treatments for Sleep Disorders

A health treatment that is not classified as conventional western medical practice is referred to as an "alternative" or "complementary" therapy, although a strict definition of complementary medicine suggests that it is taken along with conventional treatments. Alternative medicine, also called alternative therapy, encompasses a variety of disciplines that include everything from diet and exercise to mental conditioning and lifestyle changes. Examples of alternative therapies include acupuncture, guided imagery, yoga, hypnosis, biofeedback, aromatherapy, relaxation, herbal remedies, massage, and many others.

In the area of sleep disorders, some complementary and alternative therapies used include supplements, relaxation and meditation, acupuncture, and exercise.

Recommended Related to Mind, Body, Spirit

WebMD Checkup: Joan Didion

Your best-selling book The Year of Magical Thinking chronicles your grief following the loss of your husband, John. What surprised you most about grieving? I did not expect the degree of derangement-both physiological and mental. An example of the latter: Two weeks after John died, when I filled out a hospital form for the autopsy report, I gave not my own address but that of an apartment in which we had lived for the first four or five months of our marriage, in 1964. Is there...

Read the WebMD Checkup: Joan Didion article > >

Supplements for Sleep Disorders

Herbal Treatments

The effects of the root of valerian (Valeriana officinalis) have been examined in people with sleep disorders. Some studies have suggested that valerian helps with the onset of sleep and with sleep maintenance. However, more research is needed into valerian root's safety and effectiveness.

Chamomile and passionflower are other herbs commonly used in the treatment of insomnia, but there has been no clinical investigation to support their use and long-term safety.

Other herbs promoted as effective sleep remedies include hops, ginseng, lemon balm, and skullcap. The German government has approved certain herbs (valerian, hops, and lemon balm) for the relief of sleep problems. However, clinical studies to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of herbs are scarce. More information is needed before these herbs can be recommended as a first line of treatment for insomnia.

Since herbal supplements can interact with certain medications, always tell your doctor if you are using any herbal supplements.

Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone that is synthesized by the pineal gland in humans and produced in animals and in plants. Although the effects of melatonin are complex and poorly understood, it plays a critical role in the regulation of your sleeping and waking cycle and other circadian rhythms. Melatonin has been studied as a possible treatment of circadian rhythm disorders and may be helpful in reducing sleep disturbances caused by jet lag.

Adverse effects of melatonin are minimal, but more long-term studies examining the effectiveness and toxicity of melatonin supplements are needed.

Acupuncture for Sleep Disorders

Acupuncture is often used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of insomnia and other sleep disorders. This procedure involves inserting very fine needles (sometimes in combination with a small electrical stimulus or with heat produced by burning specific herbs) into the skin at specific points in order to influence the functioning of the body. The results of some small preliminary clinical trials of acupuncture show promise in treating insomnia. However, additional research is needed.

Relaxation and Meditation for Sleep Disorders

Increased muscle tension and intrusive thoughts interfere with sleep. Therefore, it is not surprising that techniques aimed at relaxing muscles (progressive muscle relaxation and biofeedback) and quieting the mind (meditation) have been effective treatments for insomnia. Most people can learn these techniques, but it usually takes several weeks before they can master them well enough to help ease insomnia. There is a growing body of evidence that supports the value of meditation in treating insomnia. Several studies show that regular meditation, either alone or as a part of a yoga session, results in higher blood levels of melatonin, an important regulator of sleep.

WebMD Medical Reference

Today on WebMD

Hands breaking pencil in frustration
Quiz
Dark chocolate bars
Slideshow
 
puppy eating
Slideshow
concentration killers
Slideshow
 
man reading sticky notes
Quiz
worried kid
fitArticle
 
Hungover man
Slideshow
Woman opening window
Slideshow
 
Woman yawning
Health Check
Happy and sad faces
Quiz
 
brain food
Slideshow
laughing family
Quiz