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Why Are My Lips Chapped?

You Can't Leave Them Alone

It's like your mother always said: If you don't stop picking at that, it'll never get better. Follow these tips to help your lips heal.

Don’t peel or bite flaky skin. The skin on your lips is thin and delicate. Picking at it can cause it to bleed and hurt, slow the healing process, and cause more irritation.

Don’t exfoliate. It can cause further damage to chapped lips. Instead, apply plenty of balm or ointment and turn on the humidifier.

Listen to your lips. Some treatments can do more harm than good. Ingredients like eucalyptus, menthol, and camphor can dry or irritate your lips. Stay away from them, especially if you have dry skin.

If you’re allergic to plant-based oils and moisturizers like beeswax, shea butter, castor seed, and soybean oil, switch to a petroleum jelly-based product.

Call the doctor. See a dermatologist if your problem persists. Chapping that doesn’t heal, despite regular use of lip balm, can be a sign of infection or a more serious problem, like cancer or a pre-cancer condition called actinic cheilitis.

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