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Oral Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Oral Cancer

Oral cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lips, mouth, or throat.

Oral cancer may form in any of three main areas:

  • Lips.
  • Oral cavity, which includes:
    • The front two thirds of the tongue.
    • The gingiva (gums).
    • The buccal mucosa (the lining of the inside of the cheeks).
    • The floor (bottom) of the mouth under the tongue.
    • The hard palate (the front, bony part of the roof of the mouth).
    • The retromolar trigone (the small area behind the wisdom teeth).

    cdr0000716338.jpg
    Anatomy of the oral cavity. The oral cavity includes the lips, hard palate (the bony front portion of the roof of the mouth), soft palate (the muscular back portion of the roof of the mouth), retromolar trigone (the area behind the wisdom teeth), front two-thirds of the tongue, gingiva (gums), buccal mucosa (the inner lining of the lips and cheeks), and floor of the mouth under the tongue.
  • Oropharynx, which includes:
    • The middle part of the pharynx (throat) behind the mouth.
    • The back third of the tongue.
    • The soft palate (the back, soft part of the roof of the mouth).
    • The side and back walls of the throat.
    • The tonsils.

Most oral cancers start in squamous cells (thin, flat cells) that line the lips, oral cavity, and oropharynx. Cancer that forms in squamous cells is called squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma can form from lesions on the mucous membranes (the lining of the mouth and throat). These lesions include leukoplakia (an abnormal white patch of cells) and erythroplakia (an abnormal red patch of cells).

In Western countries, such as the United States, the most common areas for oral cancer are the tongue and the floor of the mouth.

Oral cancer is more common in men than in women.

. Men are more than twice as likely as women to have oral cancer and die from it.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

    Last Updated: September 04, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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