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Testicular Cancer - Exams and Tests

If testicular cancer is suspected, your doctor will do some testing. Tests may include:

If the ultrasound and blood tests suggest testicular cancer, a doctor will surgically remove your affected testicle. It will be checked for cancer. If cancer is found, you may have other tests, such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRIs, to find out the stage of your cancer.

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Ongoing exams and tests

During your treatment for testicular cancer, your doctor will schedule a thorough follow-up program to monitor your recovery, especially if you are doing surveillance. These exams and tests may continue for several years. In addition to physical exams, your follow-up program may include:

  • Periodic imaging tests such as chest X-rays or CT scans.
  • Blood tests to check the levels of tumor markers in your blood. Tumor marker levels that are stable or that increase after you've had treatment may be a sign of more cancer.

Early detection

Testicular self-exam may help detect testicular cancer. These cancers may be first found as a painless lump or an enlarged testicle during a self-exam.

Some doctors recommend that men ages 15 to 40 perform monthly testicular self-exams (TSE). But many doctors don't believe that monthly TSE is needed for men who are at average risk for testicular cancer. Monthly TSE may be recommended for men who are at high risk for this kind of cancer. This includes men who have a history of an undescended testicle or a family or personal history of testicular cancer.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: October 14, 2013
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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