Skip to content

Children's Health

Flu Can Kill Even Healthy Children, Study Finds

Unvaccinated kids are at greater risk, CDC researcher says
Font Size
A
A
A

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Children, even those without severe medical conditions, can die from the flu in as little as three days after symptoms appear, U.S. health officials warn.

Between 2004 and 2012, flu complications killed 830 children in the United States, many of whom were otherwise healthy, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Most striking is that 35 percent of these children died before being hospitalized or within the first three days of developing symptoms, according to the report published online Oct. 28 in Pediatrics.

"We found these influenza-related deaths can occur in children with and without medical conditions and in children of all ages, and that very few of these children have been vaccinated," said lead author Dr. Karen Wong, a CDC medical epidemiologist.

Researchers who reviewed those deaths found that only 22 percent with a high-risk medical condition and just 9 percent without a significant medical condition had been vaccinated.

Wong doesn't know why so many children die so fast. "About a third of these children die within the first three days of their first reported symptoms," she said.

One expert wasn't surprised that many otherwise healthy children who died did so before being admitted to the hospital.

"First, parents don't realize that flu can be fatal," said Dr. Marcelo Laufer, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist at Miami Children's Hospital.

Second, parents of children with chronic diseases "know the system better, so they come earlier than healthy patients," he said.

Because flu can progress so quickly, prevention is really the best strategy, Wong said. "And that's why we recommend every child 6 months or older get vaccinated every year," she said.

Because an infant under 6 months of age can't be given flu vaccine, Wong said it is vital that pregnant women get a flu shot to help protect their newborn, and that everyone likely to be near the baby also be vaccinated so they can't pass flu to the infant.

Wong said children who get the flu need to be watched carefully. She recommends getting in touch with the child's doctor when symptoms start.

Today on WebMD

child with red rash on cheeks
What’s that rash?
plate of fruit and veggies
How healthy is your child’s diet?
 
smiling baby
Treating diarrhea, fever and more.
Middle school band practice
Understanding your child’s changing body.
 

worried kid
fitArticle
boy on father's shoulder
Article
 
Child with red rash on cheeks
Slideshow
girl thinking
Article
 

Loaded with tips to help you avoid food allergy triggers.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

babyapp
New
Child with adhd
Slideshow
 
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
Syringes and graph illustration
Tool