Skip to content

Cholesterol & Triglycerides Health Center

Bread, Milk, and Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs?

Should consumers be able to pick up cholesterol-lowering medicine when they go to the grocery store or drugstore?
Font Size
A
A
A
By
WebMD Health News

Jan. 7, 2000 (Washington) -- Should consumers be able to pick up cholesterol-lowering medicine when they go to the grocery store or drugstore? That's basically the question that the FDA will address later this year when it reviews its present policy of requiring that all cholesterol-lowering drugs be sold with a doctor's prescription.

For three years, the FDA's official policy has been that the cholesterol-lowering drugs are not safe enough for direct use by consumers. The rationale has been that the diagnosis of high cholesterol requires a blood test that needs medical interpretation and that the drugs are potent and require ongoing medical supervision, including liver function tests, to be used safely.

The FDA has been pressured by drug companies to change this policy. The companies maintain that most people with high cholesterol now do not get the appropriate medical diagnosis and treatment, and that the availability of the drugs without needing a prescription would expand the number of people who would benefit from them. They believe that the drugs are safe enough to be used without medical supervision.

The drug companies propose that the labels on cholesterol-lowering drugs instruct consumers to take them only after taking a blood test, or only after being diagnosed with high cholesterol by a doctor. Cholesterol blood tests are available at many health fairs.

Treating high cholesterol is much more complicated than taking a simple blood test, however, and that's one issue the FDA will take into consideration. Blood tests need to be taken with some regularity, the dose of the drugs may vary from consumer to consumer, and consumers should avoid taking the drugs entirely if they have liver problems.

For now, the FDA has decided only to reconsider its policy, not to change it. The agency's policy-makers understand that permitting the over-the-counter (OTC) sale of cholesterol-lowering drugs has many implications for physicians and how they take care of their patients, and also possesses potential safety issues for consumers.

The decision also carries significant financial impact for drug companies, for advertising agencies, and for managed care:

  • Cholesterol-lowering drugs are a multibillion-dollar market. All the drug companies that make them -- Merck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Novartis, Bayer, and Warner-Lambert -- will advocate for the switch, as they believe they can sell more products directly to the consumer.
  • Millions of dollars are now being spent advertising the drugs directly to the consumer. This advertising would increase substantially if they are moved to OTC status and companies have to compete even more aggressively for consumer market share.
  • Managed care spends billions on cholesterol-lowering drugs, which are among the most frequently prescribed medications. If the entire category were to go OTC, the costs of the prescription drugs could be shifted to the consumer's own pocketbook.

Is This Normal? Get the Facts Fast!

Is Your Cholesterol Level Heart Healthy?
What is your LDL (low-density lipoprotein) level?

Get the latest Cholesterol Management newsletter delivered to your inbox!


or
Answer:
Desirable
0-199
Borderline
200-239
High
240+

Your level is currently

Congratulations! Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal.

Congratulations! Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal.

Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is borderline high. If your LDL goes higher, your total cholesterol level could become Borderline High. Consider reducing the amount of foods you eat with saturated fats and increasing physical activity. If you get more exercise, your level of "good" HDL cholesterol may increase, which could also help to keep your levels of LDL and total cholesterol in check.

Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High. This may mean that your level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, is too low. It is best to have a high level of "good" HDL and a low level of "bad" LDL. The HDL helps keep your LDL level in check. Ask your doctor for your HDL level. If your HDL is low, increasing your physical activity can increase it, which may help reduce your LDL level.

Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. This may mean that your level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, is too low. It is best to have a high level of "good" HDL and a low level of "bad" LDL because the HDL helps keep your LDL level in check. Ask your doctor for your HDL level. If your HDL is low, increasing your physical activity can increase it, which may help reduce your LDL level.

Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High, but fortunately your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have other non-measured increases in LDL-like particles that can increase heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High, but fortunately your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have other non-measured increases in LDL-like particles that can increase heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Borderline High, too. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. But your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

Your total cholesterol is High, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have elevated secondary lipids, such as non-HDL particles that increase the risk of heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

Your total cholesterol is High, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have elevated secondary lipids, such as non-HDL particles that increase the risk of heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

Your total cholesterol level is High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Borderline High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

Your total cholesterol level is High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High, too. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels! If you are struggling to bring down your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe medication, such as statins. Following medication, dietary, and exercise instructions should result in improvements.

Your total cholesterol level is High, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels! If you are struggling to bring down your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe statins or other cholesterol-lowering medications.

Start Over

Step:  of 

Today on WebMD

woman pulling supplements from shelf
Can they help lower yours?
bowl of yogurt with heart shape
What it can do for you.
 
woman exercising
14 practical tips.
chocolate glazed donut and avocado
What your levels mean.
 
Heart Foods Slideshow
Slideshow
Cholesterol Fact or Fiction
Quiz
 
Food & Fitness Planner
TOOL
Attractive salad
ARTICLE
 
Heart Disease Overview Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
worst sandwich slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
Fat Foods Fit Foods
SLIDESHOW
woman drinking coffee
SLIDESHOW
 

WebMD Special Sections