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    Cholesterol & Triglycerides Health Center

    News Related to Cholesterol Management

    1. Experimental Cholesterol Drug Effective: Study

      By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Nov. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental antibody drug could prove effective at lowering LDL ("bad") cholesterol levels for patients who have side effects with cholesterol-lowering statin medications. That's the conclusion of a clinical trial pr

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    2. Research: 'Longevity Gene' One Key to Long Life

      By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Even among people who live well into their 90s, those with a particular gene variant may survive the longest, a new study finds. The variant is in a gene known as CETP, and researchers have known for more than a decade that

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    3. Why Statins Might Raise Diabetes Risk

      Sept. 24, 2014 -- Taking statins can lead to weight gain, raised blood sugar levels, and it can increase the chances of getting type 2 diabetes, say scientists who have been trying to explain why. But the team of international researchers acknowledges the cholesterol-lowering medication taken by mil

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    4. Older People and Generic Statins

      By Randy Dotinga HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs are more likely to fill their prescriptions and gain health benefits if the medications are cheaper generic brands, new research suggests. At issue are the cholesterol-loweri

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    5. More Docs Wonder If Statins Are Worth the Risks

      Aug. 18, 2014 -- Kailash Chand, a doctor in the U.K., says he once brushed aside patients who complained of muscle pains, weakness, fatigue, and memory problems after he put them on cholesterol-lowering medications called statins. Then a routine blood test showed he had high levels of some blood fat

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    6. Cholesterol Drugs May Speed Healing After Surgery

      By Mary Elizabeth Dallas HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, July 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Recovery time after surgery may be reduced for patients taking the cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins, according to a new study. The study's Irish researchers suspect that the drugs may affect the

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    7. Do You Need to Fast Before a Cholesterol Test?

      July 17, 2014 -- Do you really need to check your cholesterol levels on an empty stomach? New research suggests checking your cholesterol even if you’ve eaten gives you similar information. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey III (NHANES III), Bethany Doran, MD, of the NYU Schoo

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    8. Cholesterol Levels Tied to Breast Cancer Risk?

      By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, July 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- High cholesterol levels may increase a woman's risk of developing breast cancer, a large new British study reports. The findings suggest that keeping tight control over cholesterol through medication could help prevent br

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    9. Low Cholesterol Levels & Kidney Cancer Patients

      By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, June 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Low cholesterol levels may increase kidney cancer patients' risk of death, a new study suggests. The findings indicate that cholesterol testing may help guide treatment for kidney cancer patients, the study authors said.

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    10. Men Who Take Statins May Exercise Less

      By Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, June 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older men taking the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins appear to be slightly less active than those who don't take them, a new study suggests. Statin users logged about 40 fewer minutes of moderate activity each week

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    Displaying 31 - 40 of 295 Articles << Prev Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next >>

    Is This Normal? Get the Facts Fast!

    Is Your Cholesterol Level Heart Healthy?
    What is your LDL (low-density lipoprotein) level?

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    or
    Answer:
    Desirable
    0-199
    Borderline
    200-239
    High
    240+

    Your level is currently

    Congratulations! Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal.

    Congratulations! Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is borderline high. If your LDL goes higher, your total cholesterol level could become Borderline High. Consider reducing the amount of foods you eat with saturated fats and increasing physical activity. If you get more exercise, your level of "good" HDL cholesterol may increase, which could also help to keep your levels of LDL and total cholesterol in check.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High. This may mean that your level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, is too low. It is best to have a high level of "good" HDL and a low level of "bad" LDL. The HDL helps keep your LDL level in check. Ask your doctor for your HDL level. If your HDL is low, increasing your physical activity can increase it, which may help reduce your LDL level.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. This may mean that your level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, is too low. It is best to have a high level of "good" HDL and a low level of "bad" LDL because the HDL helps keep your LDL level in check. Ask your doctor for your HDL level. If your HDL is low, increasing your physical activity can increase it, which may help reduce your LDL level.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High, but fortunately your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have other non-measured increases in LDL-like particles that can increase heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High, but fortunately your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have other non-measured increases in LDL-like particles that can increase heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Borderline High, too. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. But your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol is High, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have elevated secondary lipids, such as non-HDL particles that increase the risk of heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol is High, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have elevated secondary lipids, such as non-HDL particles that increase the risk of heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Borderline High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High, too. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels! If you are struggling to bring down your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe medication, such as statins. Following medication, dietary, and exercise instructions should result in improvements.

    Your total cholesterol level is High, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels! If you are struggling to bring down your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe statins or other cholesterol-lowering medications.

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