corn and peas
1 / 12

Starchy Veggies

Some vegetables are better than others when you're watching your triglycerides. Limit how much you eat of those that are starchy, like corn and peas. That way, your body won't turn the extra starch into triglycerides. There are plenty of other options, like cauliflower, kale, and mushrooms, to choose from.

Swipe to advance
baked beans
2 / 12

Baked Beans With Sugar or Pork Added

Beans have fiber and other nutrients going for them. But if they're made with sugar or pork, they may not be the best choice. The label on the can should say what's in there, and how much sugar and fat you're getting. Switch to black beans, which are a great source of fiber and protein, without saturated fats or added sugar.

Swipe to advance
fruit salad
3 / 12

Too Much of a Good Thing

No doubt: Fruit is good for you, especially if you're having a piece of fruit instead of a rich dessert. But when you have high triglycerides, you may need to limit yourself to 2-3 pieces of fruit a day. That way, you won't get too much of the natural sugars that are in fruit. If you're having dried fruit, remember that the serving size is much smaller: 2 tablespoons of raisins, for example.

Swipe to advance
wine glasses
4 / 12

Alcohol

You may think of alcohol as being good for your heart. But too much of it can drive up your triglyceride levels. That's because of the sugars that are naturally part of alcohol, whether it's wine, beer, or liquor. Too much sugar, from any source, can be a problem. Your doctor may recommend that you not drink at all if your triglyceride levels are very high.

Swipe to advance
tuna can
5 / 12

Canned Fish Packed in Oil

Fish is good for your heart. But when you're buying canned fish, check the label to see if it's packed in oil. You're better off buying canned fish that's packed in water. Usually, both are available on the same shelf at the grocery store.

Swipe to advance
coconut ball
6 / 12

Coconut

Coconut is trendy. You can find coconut milk, coconut water, coconut flakes, coconut oil, and the fruit itself. Some say coconut has health benefits, but it's also high in saturated fats, so ask your doctor if you should limit it or avoid it completely.

Swipe to advance
noodles
7 / 12

Starchy Foods

Eat too much pasta, potatoes, or cereals and your body can turn them into triglycerides. You can still have them, but you have to stay within proper serving sizes. A serving is a slice of bread, 1/3 cup of rice or pasta, or half a cup of potatoes or cooked oatmeal.

Swipe to advance
coffee
8 / 12

Sugary Drinks

A lot of the sugar you get may come from a glass. Whether you drink sweet iced tea, regular soda, fruit juice, or a syrupy coffee drink, you may be getting more sweetness than your body can handle. It may turn some of that sugar into triglycerides. So when you're cutting back on sugar, remember to include your drinks in that, too. Limit yourself to no more than a cup (8 ounces) of sugar-sweetened drinks per day.

Swipe to advance
pancakes
9 / 12

Honey or Maple Syrup

You may think of honey and maple syrup as being healthier or more natural than refined sugar. But like sugar, they can raise your triglyceride levels. When you're working on lowering your triglycerides, cut down on sugary sweeteners across the board, even if they're not table sugar.

Swipe to advance
croissant
10 / 12

Baked Goods

Because of your high triglycerides, you should limit the saturated fat in your diet. That includes the saturated fat in the butter that's baked into pastries. You should also avoid trans fats altogether. Check the nutrition facts label to be sure.

Swipe to advance
steak on grill
11 / 12

High-Fat Meats

You don't have to give up meat completely. But consider choosing leaner cuts. Also, avoid all processed meats, including bacon, sausage, and ham, as these types of meats are believed to contribute to heart disease and diabetes.

Swipe to advance
butter
12 / 12

Butter or Margarine

Use olive oil as a replacement for butter and margarine, which may have too much saturated fat or trans fat, when cooking meats and vegetables or making salad dressing. Canola, walnut, and flaxseed oils are also great alternatives.

Swipe to advance

Up Next

Next Slideshow Title

Sources | Medically Reviewed on 05/18/2016 Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein, MD on May 18, 2016

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

(1)    VankaD / iStock / 360
(2)    Azurita / iStock / 360
(3)    GANCINO / iStock / 360
(4)    Eachat / iStock / 360
(5)    macroart / iStock / 360
(6)    AmalliaEka / iStock / 360
(7)    moggara12 / iStock / 360
(8)    NikiLitov / iStock / 360
(9)    Robyn Mackenzie / iStock / 360
(10)  Rungjarat / iStock / 360
(11)  Shaiith / iStock / 360
(12)  Ingram Publishing

*ALL THINKSTOCK*

SOURCES:

Stanford Hospital: "How to Lower High Triglycerides Through Dietary and Lifestyle Changes."
University of South Florida Health: "Guidelines for Low Cholesterol, Low-Triglyceride Diets Foods to Avoid."
American Heart Association: "Triglycerides: Frequently Asked Questions."
University of Wisconsin: "Heart Health: Eating Guidelines to Lower Triglycerides."
University of Massachusetts Medical School: “What You Can Do to Lower Your Triglycerides”
American Heart Association: “Monounsaturated Fats”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein, MD on May 18, 2016

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.