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Reducing BPA Exposure continued...

Still, canned food "is cheap, convenient, and can be healthy when it is low in sodium," she tells WebMD. "[But] fresh and frozen foods may offer the same health benefits minus the BPA exposure."

Ted Schettler, MD, MPH, is the science director of the Science and Environmental Health Network, a public and environmental health advocacy group. He reviewed the findings for WebMD. "The numbers are dramatic," he says. "BPA levels go way up when you eat canned soup."

And while Schettler says the way they measured the BPA may not be the best way to fully show the amount of BPA throughout the body, "these spikes may be important and at some point we have to decide since we do have alternatives," he says. BPA-free alternatives including natural oils and resins are beings studied, and can also be used as an alternative to BPA in metal can linings.

A study released last week by the Breast Cancer Fund found BPA in many of the canned foods that we associate with Thanksgiving. "Many canned foods beyond soups, including those used in popular Thanksgiving dishes, contain BPA," says Sharima Rasanayagam, PhD, the director of science at the Breast Cancer Fund in San Francisco.

"When you think of the possible daily exposure to BPA from canned foods, you start to see the urgency of getting this chemical out of food cans," she says in a statement.

Other Perspectives

"There's no controversy that canned goods contain trace levels of BPA to properly seal the can to prevent botulism," says Jeff Stier. He is a senior fellow at the National Center for Public Policy Research, a conservative think tank based in Washington, D.C. "It is no surprise that daily consumption would increase trace levels of BPA in the urine over the short term."

"[But] this small ... study does nothing to substantiate claims that trace levels of BPA -- even from daily canned soup consumption -- have any effect on health," he tells WebMD.

Stier's sentiments are echoed by John Rost, PhD. He is the chairman of the North American Metal Packaging Alliance, Inc., an industry trade organization representing metal packaging manufacturers.

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