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  • Question 1/9

    How long does it take food to reach your stomach?

  • Answer 1/9

    How long does it take food to reach your stomach?

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    When you swallow food, it enters your esophagus. That’s a stretchy tube about 10 inches long that connects the back of the throat to the stomach. It’s narrow, but the muscles in its walls slowly squeeze food down and through. This is called peristalsis. It normally takes just a couple of seconds for each bite.

  • Question 1/9

    Digestion happens mostly in the stomach.

  • Answer 1/9

    Digestion happens mostly in the stomach.

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    But it starts there. Food and drinks mix with gastric juices. This creates a mixture called chyme. That’s dumped into the small intestine, where most of the digestion takes place. From there, food is dissolved, nutrients are absorbed into the body, and waste is sent to the colon.

  • Question 1/9

    What’s the best way to shrink the size of your stomach?

  • Answer 1/9

    What’s the best way to shrink the size of your stomach?

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    No exercise can change the size of your actual stomach. When it’s empty, it’s only about as big as a fist. Planks, sit-ups, and crunches can tone your abdominal muscles, which lie between your stomach and your skin. But even that may not give you visible results. To really "lose your belly," you need to shed the layer of fat that sits on top of your ab muscles. Any kind of workout that gets your heart rate up and burns calories will help. So will eating fewer calories.

  • Question 1/9

    The most common cause of food poisoning in the U.S. is:

  • Answer 1/9

    The most common cause of food poisoning in the U.S. is:

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    One in 6 Americans gets sick every year from contaminated food. Norovirus, also called the stomach flu, causes swelling in the stomach and intestines. That leads to pain, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. Some foods -- like oysters, fruits, and vegetables -- can be contaminated naturally. They can also be tainted by an infected person, like a restaurant cook or server. Harmful bacteria, like E. coli, salmonella, and listeria, are also common sources of food poisoning.

  • Question 1/9

    Foods that contain insoluble fiber (which does not dissolve in water) cause less gas and bloating than those with soluble fiber (which does dissolve in water).

  • Answer 1/9

    Foods that contain insoluble fiber (which does not dissolve in water) cause less gas and bloating than those with soluble fiber (which does dissolve in water).

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    Soluble fiber is found in oat bran, peas, beans, and most fruits. Bacteria in your large intestine break it down and digest it. In about one-third of people, it creates methane gas. That can make you burp, fart, or feel bloated. Insoluble fiber is found in wheat bran and some vegetables. It’s not digested by the body. It passes through the intestines unchanged, so it makes little gas.

  • Question 1/9

    Drinking coffee can cause a bowel movement.

  • Answer 1/9

    Drinking coffee can cause a bowel movement.

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    Ever finish your morning cup of joe only to find yourself running to the bathroom? If so, it's not just you. According to the American Chemical Society, coffee has this effect on about 30% of people. It's not the caffeine. Scientists believe a compound in the drink causes the stomach to make extra gastric acid. That can cause it to dump its contents into the intestines earlier than it normally would. Coffee has also been shown to increase digestive hormones in the intestines, which help move waste along.

  • Question 1/9

    If you have acid reflux, which of the following can improve symptoms?

  • Answer 1/9

    If you have acid reflux, which of the following can improve symptoms?

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    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) happens when the stomach's contents flow backward into the esophagus. If you’re overweight, dropping some pounds can relieve some of the pressure on your stomach. If you get acid reflux when you lie down at night, raise the head of your bed. Gravity can help keep stomach acid down. One study found that eating four to five small meals a day relieved symptoms better than three large ones. If these things don't help, talk to your doctor about treatment options.

  • Answer 1/9

    Which of these digests the fastest?

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    • Correct Answer:

    They pass through your stomach and small intestine much faster than protein or fat. Simple carbs, like fruit juice and table sugar, travel fastest, followed by complex carbs like those found in whole wheat bread and vegetables. Your body has to break down protein before it can digest it. Fat takes the longest to process, but it supplies the body with more than twice the calories as either protein or carbs.

  • Question 1/9

    Which of these has not been shown to cause stomach ulcers?

  • Answer 1/9

    Which of these has not been shown to cause stomach ulcers?

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    They may irritate your stomach if you have an ulcer, but there’s no research to prove they cause it. A reason you might want to avoid soda: Soft drinks, both regular and diet, have been linked to increased belly fat. Usually, ulcers form because of an infection with the bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)or because of damage from long-term use of drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen.

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Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on December 13, 2015 Medically Reviewed on December 13, 2015

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
December 13, 2015

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

KidsHealth.org: “The Digestive System.”

University of Utah Health Care: “The Digestive Process: How Does the Esophagus Work?”

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: “Your Digestive System and How It Works.”

Penn State Eberly College of Science: “The Stomach.”

Foodsafety.gov: “Food Poisoning.”

CDC: “Overview.”

The University of Chicago Medicine: “Gas in the Digestive Tract.”

American Chemical Society: “Why does coffee make you...'go'?

University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers: “Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).”

Richter, J. Advances in GERD , published online September 2009.

Merck Manual: “Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Fats.”

The Preventive Medicine Center: “Esophagitis, Hiatus Hernia, “GERD” and Ulcer Disease.”

University of California: “Diet soda and belly fat: a growing concern.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.