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    Conditions Similar to Epilepsy

    What Conditions Are Similar to Epilepsy?

    Having a seizure doesn't necessarily mean you have epilepsy. Many conditions have symptoms similar to epilepsy, including first seizures, febrile seizures, nonepileptic events, eclampsia, meningitis, encephalitis, and migraine headaches.

    First Seizures
    A first seizure is a one-time event that can be brought on by a drug or by anesthesia. These seizures usually don't recur.

    Some seizures may occur on their own, without any trigger. In the majority of cases, these seizures won't take place again unless the person has suffered brain damage, or has a family history of epilepsy.

    Febrile Seizures
    Febrile seizures can occur in a child with a high fever, and usually don't develop into epilepsy. The chances of having another febrile seizure are 25% to 30%. There is a higher risk of seizure recurrence if the child has a family history of epilepsy, some damage to the nervous system before the seizure, or a long or complicated seizure.

    Nonepileptic Events
    Nonepileptic events look like seizures, but actually are not. Conditions that may cause nonepileptic events include narcolepsy (a sleep disorder causing recurrent episodes of sleep during the day), Tourette's syndrome (a neurological condition characterized by vocal and body tics), and abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias). Nonepileptic events that have a psychological basis are known as psychogenic seizures. A person who has this type of seizure may simply be trying to avoid stressful situations or may have a psychiatric problem. Because most people who have these types of seizures don't have epilepsy, they are often treated by psychiatrists and/or other mental health specialists. One way of distinguishing an epileptic seizure with a nonepileptic seizure is through an electroencephalogram (EEG), coupled with video monitoring. The EEG detects abnormal electrical discharges in the brain that are characteristic of epilepsy, and along with video monitoring to capture a seizure on camera, can confirm a diagnosis.

    Eclampsia
    Eclampsia is a dangerous condition suffered by pregnant women. The symptoms include seizures and a sudden rise in blood pressure. A pregnant woman who has an unexpected seizure should be taken to the hospital immediately. After the eclampsia is treated and the baby is delivered, the mother usually will not have any more seizures or develop epilepsy.

    Meningitis
    Meningitis is an infection that causes swelling of the membranes of the brain and spinal cord. Meningitis is most often caused by a virus or bacteria. Viral infections usually clear up without treatment, but bacterial infections are extremely dangerous and can lead to brain damage and even death. Symptoms of meningitis include fever and chills, severe headache, vomiting, and stiff neck.

    Encephalitis
    Encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain and is usually caused by a viral infection. Symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting, confusion, and stiff neck.

    Migraine
    Migraine is a type of headache thought to be caused, in part, by a neurological dysfunction and narrowing of blood vessels in the head and neck, which reduces the flow of blood to the brain. People who have migraines may also have auras and other symptoms, including dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Certain conditions may bring about a migraine, including allergies, menstrual periods, and muscle tension. Some foods, including red wine, chocolate, nuts, caffeine, and peanut butter, can also cause a migraine.

    Recommended Related to Epilepsy

    On the Frontline of Epilepsy Treatment

    Treatments for epilepsy have come a long way in the last decade. There are twice as many epilepsymedications today than 10 years ago. Researchers have learned more about the causes of epilepsy and continue developing new methods of treatment, like nerve stimulation. This all adds up to a good prognosis for the nearly 3 million people with epilepsy in the U.S. With proper treatment, most people with epilepsy can live healthy lives without seizures. To find out the current state of epilepsy treatment,...

    Read the On the Frontline of Epilepsy Treatment article > >

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD on January 24, 2015

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