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Food Poisoning: Toxoplasmosis - Topic Overview

How is toxoplasmosis diagnosed?

Because there are typically no symptoms, it is hard to know whether you are infected. If you think that you may have toxoplasmosis, talk to your doctor. He or she may do specific blood tests for toxoplasmosis.

  • If you have an impaired immune system, get the blood test for Toxoplasma gondii. If your test is positive, it means that you have been infected at some time in your life. Your doctor can tell you if and when you need to take medicine to prevent the infection from reactivating. If your test is negative, you have not been infected, and you can take precautions to avoid infection.
  • If you are planning to become pregnant, consider being tested for Toxoplasma gondii. If the test is positive, it means you have already been infected at some time in your life and you probably don't have to worry about passing the infection to your future baby (discuss this with your doctor). If the test is negative, take precautions to avoid infection.
  • If you are pregnant, you and your doctor should discuss your risk of toxoplasmosis. Your doctor may order a blood sample for testing.

How is it treated?

In an otherwise healthy person who is not pregnant, treatment is not needed. Symptoms will usually go away within a few weeks.

For pregnant women or people who have weakened immune systems, medicines are available to treat toxoplasmosis. For more information, see the topic Toxoplasmosis During Pregnancy.

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