Skip to content

Food & Recipes

Bottled May Not Be Better When It Comes to Water

Font Size
A
A
A
By
WebMD Health News

April 10, 2000 (Atlanta) -- Raise a glass of good, old-fashioned tap water to toast this news: when it comes to water, bottled may not be better. Bottled water frequently contains less than the recommended levels of fluoride, which could cause a rise in tooth decay among children. And bottled water is not as pure as many people think, according to a recent report.

Experts writing in the March issue of the journal Archives of Family Medicine say the same standards should apply to both tap and bottled water, because bottled water is more and more often used as a substitute for tap water.

For the study, researchers took tap water samples from four processing plants in Cleveland and compared them with five types of bottled water samples, measuring fluoride and bacteria levels in both.

Only 5% of the bottled water purchased in Cleveland fell within the fluoride range recommended by the state, and nearly 90% of the bottled water samples contained less than a third of the fluoride recommended.

Not only did 100% of the tap water samples fall within the recommended range, but all of it was within 0.04% of hitting the state's optimal fluoride level mark -- 1.0 mg of fluoride per liter.

And while two-thirds of the bottled water samples did indeed have a lower bacterial count than the tap water samples, 25% had a whopping 10 times more bacteria. Bacteria in tap water samples varied only slightly.

Even though the EPA recently required that local water systems regularly report the quality of the local tap water to the community, no similar proposals requiring bottled water to report its quality on its label are on the table, researchers note.

"Bottled water should have to meet the same standards as tap water," says James Lalumandier, DDS, MPH, a professor of dentistry at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. "But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration doesn't require bottled water to contain enough fluoride to prevent tooth decay." Lalumandier says this could cause tooth decay to increase, particularly among children.

Today on WebMD

Four spoons with mustards
What condiments are made of and how much to use.
salmon and spinach
How to get what you need.
 
grilled veggies
Easy ideas for dinner tonight.
Greek Salad
Health benefits, what you can eat and more.
 

WebMD Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.



bread
Recipes
soup
Recipes
 
roasted chicken
Recipes
grilled steak
Video
 

Loaded with tips to help you avoid food allergy triggers.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

vegetarian sandwich
Recipes
fresh vegetables
Recipes
 
smoothie
fitArticle
Foods To Boost Mens Heath Slideshow
Slideshow