Skip to content

    Atrial Fibrillation Health Center

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Disease

    What Causes Atrial Fibrillation?

    Atrial fibrillation is associated with many conditions, including:

     

    Less Common Causes of Atrial Fibrillation

    Less common causes of atrial fibrillation include:

    In at least 10% of people with AF, no underlying heart disease is found. In many of these people, AF may be related to alcohol or excessive caffeine use, stress, certain drugs, electrolyte or metabolic imbalances, or severe infections. In some people, no cause can be found.

    The risk of AF increases with age, particularly after age 60. According to the CDC, AF affects roughly one in every 10 people ages 80 and older.

    Why Is Atrial Fibrillation Dangerous?

    Many people live for years with atrial fibrillation without problems. However, because the atria are beating rapidly and irregularly, blood does not flow through them as quickly. This makes the blood more likely to clot. If a blood clot is pumped out of the heart, it can travel to the brain, resulting in a stroke. The likelihood of a stroke in people with AF is five to seven times higher than in the general population. Although about half of all blood clots related to AF result in stroke, clots can travel to other parts of the body -- such as the kidney, heart, or intestines -- also causing problems.

    AF can also decrease the heart's pumping ability by as much as 20%-25%. AF combined with a fast heart rate over a period of days to months can result in heart failure. Control of AF can then improve heart failure.

    How Is Atrial Fibrillation Diagnosed?

    Four tests are used to diagnose atrial fibrillation, including:

    • Electrocardiogram
    • Holter monitor
    • Portable event monitor (also called a loop recorder)
    • Transtelephonic monitor or wireless monitor (via the Internet)

    These monitoring devices help your doctor learn if you are having irregular heartbeats, what kind they are, how long they last, and what may be causing them.

    1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

    Today on WebMD

    pacemaker next to xray
    Ablation, cardioversion, pacemaker, and more.
    stethoscope
    What you need to know.
     
    woman doing yoga
    Tips for easing stress.
    fish and vegetables
    How to eat to protect your heart.
     
    Omega 3 Overview Slideshow
    Slideshow
    At Risk for Heart Disease
    Article
     
    Recognizing Womens Heart Symptoms
    Article
    Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
    Slideshow
     

    Resolved To Quit Smoking
    Slideshow
    Lowering Blood Pressure Slideshow
    Slideshow
     
    Heart Disease And Ed
    Article
    Atrial fibrillation
    Slideshow