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    How Can I Prevent Heart Disease?

    Our cardiac expert shares five easy ways to improve your heart health.
    By
    WebMD Magazine - Feature
    Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

    In every issue of WebMD the Magazine, we ask our experts to answer readers' questions about a wide range of topics. In our September 2011 issue, we gave a reader's question about preventing heart disease to James Beckerman, MD, WebMD's heart health expert.

    Q : Heart disease runs in my family. What can I really do now to help prevent it?

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    A : Cut out these five things to greatly reduce your risk:

    Smoking (or hanging around with smokers). Smoking is the most dangerous -- yet most reversible -- risk factor for heart disease. Quitting smoking and avoiding secondhand smoke today will lower your heart disease risk to that of a nonsmoker over time.

    Eating trans fats. Synthetically created to extend the shelf life of baked goods and snack foods, trans fats can raise your level of LDL ("bad") cholesterol, too. Best bet? Check the label for trans fats (also called partially hydrogenated oils) and avoid them entirely.

    Adding salt. Eating a lower-salt diet can lower your blood pressure by five points, which for many people can mean one less prescription to buy.

    Gaining weight. Processed food, oversized portions, and increased screen time have added inches to our waistlines and layers of risk to our hearts. Losing weight can help.

    Giving up on medications. No one likes to take pills. But blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes medications will also reduce your likelihood of a heart attack. Talk to  your doctor about a medication regimen that will work for you, then stick with it.

    Reviewed on June 15, 2011

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