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    Heart Disease Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Heart Disease

    1. Heart Disease and Antiplatelet Drugs

      WebMD examines antiplatelet drugs, a group of powerful medications that prevent the formation of blood clots. Learn more about antiplatelet drugs and heart disease.

    2. Heart Disease and Heart Attacks

      Learn what happens during a heart attack, including information about symptoms and treatment.

    3. Heart Disease and Aortic Aneurysm

      WebMD helps you understand an aortic aneurism and how it can threaten your health.

    4. Heart Failure and the Echocardiogram

      Learn more about echocardiograms and how they're used in the diagnosis of heart failure.

    5. Abnormal Heart Rhythms and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICD)

      Abnormal heart rhythms sometimes require the use of an ICD or implantable cardioverter defibrillator. WebMD explains how the device works.

    6. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) - Topic Overview

      Pulse and blood pressure measurements taken in different areas of the body help diagnose peripheral arterial disease.PulseIn the legs, doctors will commonly feel for pulses in the femoral (groin), popliteal (back of the knee), posterior tibial (ankle), and dorsalis pedis (foot) areas. Other pulses often checked include the radial (wrist), brachial (forearm), and carotid (neck) areas. The pulses are graded for record-keeping purposes so that doctors can keep track of how a person's pulse changes over time. Your doctor uses a number system to rate your pulse. Your doctor will listen to your pulse with a stethoscope for a whooshing sound called a bruit (say broo-E). A bruit might mean there is a blockage in the artery. Blood pressureFor peripheral arterial disease, blood pressure might be taken at the ankles, toes, legs, and arms.Blood pressures are typically taken with a blood pressure cuff. But blood pressure can be measured using catheters placed inside the arteries. Because the

    7. Catecholamines in Urine

      A test for catecholamines measures the amount of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine produced by nerve tissue (including the brain) and the inner part of the adrenal glands.

    8. Low-Salt Diets: Eating Out

      For many people,eating out is something they do to relax and socialize. You don't have to give this up when you are on a low-sodium diet,but it is important to be more careful about what you order in a restaurant. Sodium is not just in table salt. You can also find it in sodium citrate,sodium bicarbonate (baking soda),and monosodium glutamate (MSG). Asian foods often have MSG as well as ...

    9. Healthy Eating: Eating Less Sodium

      When you have heart failure, you need to eat less sodium, which is a component of salt. You will feel better and will lower your risk of being hospitalized by following the suggestions in this Actionset.Key pointsYour doctor may limit your sodium intake to less than per day.Keeping track of your sodium intake is the surest way of evaluating your diet.Processed foods and restaurant foods typically

    10. Angioplasty for Peripheral Arterial Disease of the Legs

      Angioplasty (also called percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, or PTA) is a procedure in which a thin, flexible tube called a catheter is inserted through an artery and guided to the place where the artery is narrowed. Once the tube reaches the narrowed artery, a small balloon at the end of the tube inflates for 20 seconds to 3 minutes. The pressure from the inflated balloon presses the fat and .

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