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Heart Disease Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Heart Disease

  1. Heart Attack: How to Prevent Another One - Topic Overview

    After you've had a heart attack, you may be worried that you could have another one. That's easy to understand. But the good news is that there are things you can do to reduce your risk of having another heart attack. Taking medicine, doing cardiac rehabilitation, and making healthy lifestyle changes can help.Take your medicinesYou'll take medicines to help prevent another heart attack. Be sure to take your medicines exactly as prescribed. And don't stop taking them unless your doctor tells you to. If you stop taking your medicines, you can increase your risk of having another heart attack.Some of the medicines your doctor may prescribe include:Aspirin and other antiplatelet medicines to prevent blood clots.Statins to lower high cholesterol.Beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors to lower blood pressure and reduce the workload on your heart.Manage other health problemsYou can help lower your chance of having another heart attack by managing other health problems that you might have. Health

  2. Topic Overview

    Cardiac cachexia is unintentional severe weight loss caused by heart disease. The weight loss might be life-threatening. It can happen to people with severe heart failure. Even with a very good appetite and high calorie intake,some people lose muscle mass. Cardiac cachexia can require supplemental nutrition. How does heart failure cause it? Heart failure may cause blood to back up into the ...

  3. Atrial Fibrillation - Cause

    Atrial fibrillation is caused by a problem with the electrical activity of the heart.Conditions that damage the heart muscle or strain the heart often cause atrial fibrillation. These include:High blood pressure, a condition in which the force of blood against artery walls is too strong. Normal blood pressure is 119 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) systolic over 79 mm Hg diastolic or below. ...

  4. Pacemaker for Heart Failure (Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) uses a special type of pacemaker called a biventricular pacemaker (say by-ven-TRICK-yuh-ler) to treat heart failure. This pacemaker sends electrical pulses to make the ventricles pump at the same time. A biventricular pacemaker is implanted in the chest, and it connects to three thin wires, called leads. The leads go into different chambers of your heart. If there is a problem with your heartbeat, the pacemaker sends a painless signal through the leads to fix the problem. The pacemaker also can speed up your heart if it is beating too slowly. In some cases, you may get a pacemaker that is combined with a device to shock your heartbeat back to a normal rhythm if it is dangerously fast. The device is called an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or ICD. It can prevent sudden death. Your doctor will put the pacemaker in your chest during minor surgery. You will not have open-chest surgery.Your doctor makes a small cut (incision) in your chest.

  5. Heart Problems: Living With a Pacemaker

    A pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) helps protect you against dangerous heart rhythms. It's important to know how these devices work and how to keep them working right. Learning a few important facts about pacemakers and ICDs can help you get the best results from your device. Key points Avoid strong magnetic and electrical fields. These can keep your device from ...

  6. Beta-Blockers for Atrial Fibrillation

    Drug details for Beta-blockers for atrial fibrillation.

  7. Beta-Blockers for Heart Failure

    Drug details for Beta-blockers for heart failure.

  8. Aortic Valve Stenosis: Treatment When You Have Other Heart Problems - Topic Overview

    If aortic valve stenosis happens along with other heart problems, such as other valve problems, it can affect the decision of when to have surgery to replace the valve.Other valve problemsThe following valve problems might happen along with aortic valve stenosis:Mitral regurgitation: A leaky mitral valveMitral stenosis: A narrowed mitral valveAortic regurgitation: An aortic valve that also leaksHow are aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation treated together?If you have aortic regurgitation in addition to aortic stenosis, replacing your aortic valve will fix both problems. Deciding when to have surgery might depend on which problem is more serious and if you have symptoms.How are aortic stenosis and mitral valve problems treated together?Your doctor might suggest a surgery to repair or replace the mitral valve and replace the aortic valve at the same time. But it is more risky to have multiple-valve surgery than to replace a single valve. As a result, treatment of multiple valve

  9. Cardiac Rehabilitation Phase I: In the Hospital - Topic Overview

    Cardiac rehabilitation phase I starts while you are in the hospital and emphasizes exercise and education. The parts of phase I include: A customized exercise program,based on your medical history,clinical condition,and symptoms. Discharge instructions about recovery activities. Education on lifestyle changes and how to lower your risk of future heart problems. Ways to help your body ...

  10. Congenital Heart Defects - What Increases Your Risk

    In most cases, the cause of a congenital heart defect is not known. However, certain things increase your baby's chances of developing a heart defect.

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