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High Blood Pressure and ACE Inhibitors

Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are high blood pressure drugs that widen or dilate the blood vessels to improve the amount of blood the heart pumps and to lower blood pressure. ACE inhibitors also increase blood flow, which helps to decrease the amount of work your heart has to do and can help protect your kidneys from the effects of hypertension and diabetes.

ACE inhibitors are used to treat a number of heart-related conditions, including high blood pressure, heart failure, heart attack, and preventing kidney damage associated with high blood pressure and diabetes. Examples of ACE inhibitors include:

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What Are the Side Effects of ACE Inhibitors?

Like any drug, an ACE inhibitor is likely to have some side effects. They may include:

  • Cough. If this symptom persists or is severe, contact your doctor. Ask your doctor what type of cough medicine you should use to control the cough.
  • Red, itchyskin or rash. Contact your doctor; do not treat the rash yourself.
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness or faintness upon rising. This side effect may be strongest after the first dose, especially if you have been taking a diuretic (water pill). Get up more slowly. Contact your doctor if these symptoms persist or are severe.
  • Salty or metallic taste or a decreased ability to taste. This effect usually goes away as you continue taking the medication.
  • Physical symptoms.Sore throat, fever, mouth sores, unusual bruising, fast or irregular heartbeat, chest pain, and swelling of feet, ankles and lower legs. Contact your doctor if you have any of these symptoms.
  • Swelling of your neck, face, and tongue. See a doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms. These represent a serious emergency.
  • High potassiumlevels. This is a potentially life-threatening complication. Therefore, people on ACE inhibitors should regularly have blood tests to measure potassium levels. Signs of too much potassium in the body include confusion, irregular heartbeat, nervousness, numbness or tingling in hands, feet or lips, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, and weakness or heaviness in legs. Contact your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms.
  • Kidney failure. Although ACE inhibitors help to protect the kidneys, it can also cause kidney failure in some people.
  • Severe vomiting or diarrhea. If you have severe vomiting or diarrhea you may become dehydrated, which can lead to low blood pressure. Contact your doctor right away.

Also contact your doctor if you have any other symptoms that cause concern.

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