Skip to content

    Hypertension/High Blood Pressure Health Center

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Pharmacist-Guided Home Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Study found combination led to better control of hypertension

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Serena Gordon

    HealthDay Reporter

    TUESDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Using home blood pressure monitoring and partnering with a pharmacist for lifestyle advice and medication changes led to better control of hypertension, a new study shows.

    After six months of the intervention, nearly 72 percent of the study volunteers had their high blood pressure under control compared to 45 percent in the group that received usual care. Also, the effects of the intervention persisted even after the intervention ended. Six months later, about 72 percent of the intervention group had their high blood pressure under control compared to 57 percent in the usual care group.

    "The reason that only about half of people with [high] blood pressure have it under control is that usual care isn't working. We combined two interventions that we thought would be very powerful together -- home monitoring and pharmacist managements -- and this is one system that we've shown works very well for blood pressure control," said senior investigator Dr. Karen Margolis, from the HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research in Minneapolis.

    The findings appear in the July 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    High blood pressure affects about 30 percent of U.S. adults, according to background information in the study. Treating and controlling high blood pressure can help prevent cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks. However, only about half of the adults in the United States with high blood pressure have it under control.

    Home blood pressure monitoring has shown some success in helping people lower their blood pressure, so the researchers took that a step further and used telemonitoring devices that could send blood pressure readings to a pharmacist who could then adjust that person's blood pressure medication accordingly.

    The study included 450 people receiving care at one of eight different clinics. All of the people recruited for the study had high blood pressure that wasn't well controlled.

    The patients were randomized to receive either usual care (222 people) or the study intervention, which included blood pressure telemonitoring with pharmacist management.

    1 | 2 | 3

    Today on WebMD

    blood pressure
    Symptoms, causes, and more.
    headache
    Learn the causes.
     
    Compressed heart
    5 habits to change.
    Mature man floating in pool, goggles on head
    Exercises that help.
     
    heart healthy living
    ARTICLE
    Erectile Dysfunction Slideshow
    SLIDESHOW
     
    Bernstein Hypertension Affects Cardiac Risk
    VIDEO
    Compressed heart
    Article
     
    Heart Disease Overview Slideshow
    SLIDESHOW
    thumbnail for lowering choloesterol slideshow
    SLIDESHOW
     
    Heart Foods Slideshow
    SLIDESHOW
    Low Blood Pressure
    VIDEO
     

    WebMD Special Sections