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    Vitamin B6 Linked to Lower Lung Cancer Risk

    Study Finds Association in Smokers, Nonsmokers
    By
    WebMD Health News
    Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

    June 15, 2010 -- Having higher blood levels of vitamin B6 and the amino acid methionine both appear to reduce lung cancer risk in smokers and nonsmokers alike, according to a new study.

    "We found that vitamin B6 and methionine are strongly associated with reducing lung cancer risk in people who never smoked, those who quit, and current smokers," researcher Paul Brennan, PhD, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, tells WebMD.

    Whether the link is cause and effect, he says, is not known.

    In the U.S. alone, more than 219,000 new cases of lung cancer were expected in 2009, according to the American Cancer Society, with about 160,000 deaths.

    The study, funded by the World Cancer Research Fund and others, is published in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

    Vitamin B6 and Lung Cancer Risk: Study Details

    Brennan and colleagues evaluated levels of B6 and methionine in blood samples from participants in the large European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, which enrolled more than 519,000 participants from 10 European countries between 1992 and 2000.

    His team zeroed in on 899 lung cancer cases and compared them to a group of 1,770 healthy comparison-group participants, matched to the lung cancer patients by country, sex, date of birth, and when the blood was collected.

    They classified the participants into four groups, depending on blood levels of vitamin B6, which helps the body break down protein, maintain red blood cells, and perform other bodily functions, and methionine, which is involved in B vitamin metabolism.

    After accounting for smoking, Brennan and colleagues found that the higher the vitamin B6 and methionine, the lower the lung cancer risk.

    People in the highest group for vitamin B levels had a 56% reduced lung cancer risk, compared to those in the lowest group. Those with the highest methionine levels had a 48% reduced lung cancer risk, the researchers found.

    ''That's quite a strong effect," Brennan says, but emphasizes that more study is needed.

    Some previous research, he says, looked only at smokers and linked vitamin B6 to a reduced lung cancer risk. His study, by including never smokers and past smokers, expands the information about the link.

    Vitamin B6 is found in beans, grains, meat, poultry, fish, and some fruits and vegetables. Methionine is found in animal protein, some nuts, and vegetable seeds.

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