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    Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Table 1. Comparison of Diagnostic Criteria for Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome (BCNS) continued...

    A 9p22.3 microdeletion syndrome that includes the PTCH1 locus has been described in ten children.[117] All patients had facial features typical of BCNS, including a broad forehead, but they had other features variably including craniosynostosis, hydrocephalus, macrosomia, and developmental delay. At the time of the report, none had basal cell skin cancer. On the basis of their hemizygosity of the PTCH1 gene, these patients are presumably at an increased risk of basal cell skin cancer.

    Rare syndromes

    Rombo syndrome

    Rombo syndrome, a very rare genetic disorder associated with BCC, has been outlined in three case series in the literature.[118,119,120] The cutaneous examination is within normal limits until age 7 to 10 years, with the development of distinctive cyanotic erythema of the lips, hands, and feet and early atrophoderma vermiculatum of the cheeks, with variable involvement of the elbows and dorsal hands and feet.[118] Development of BCC occurs in the fourth decade.[118] A distinctive grainy texture to the skin, secondary to interspersed small, yellowish, follicular-based papules and follicular atrophy, has been described.[118,120] Missing, irregularly distributed and/or misdirected eyelashes and eyebrows are another associated finding.[118,119]

    Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome

    Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome, another rare genodermatosis associated with development of BCC, has more thorough documentation in the literature than Rombo syndrome. Inheritance is accomplished in an X-linked dominant fashion, with no reported male-to-male transmission.[121,122,123] Regional assignment of the locus of interest to chromosome Xq24-q27 is associated with a maximum LOD score of 5.26 with the DXS1192 locus.[124]

    Characteristic physical findings include hypotrichosis, hypohidrosis, milia, follicular atrophoderma of the cheeks, and multiple BCC, which manifest in the late second decade to early third decade.[121] Documented hair changes with Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome include reduced density of scalp and body hair, decreased melanization,[125] a twisted/flattened appearance of the hair shaft on electron microscopy,[126] and increased hair shaft diameter on polarizing light microscopy.[123] The milia, which may be quite distinctive in childhood, have been reported to regress or diminish substantially at puberty.[123] Other reported findings in association with this syndrome include trichoepitheliomas; hidradenitis suppurativa; hypoplastic alae; and a prominent columella, the fleshy terminal portion of the nasal septum.[127,128]

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