Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Menopause Health Center

Select An Article
Font Size

Pap Test After Menopause

A Pap test looks for changes in the cells of the cervix that show cervical cancer or conditions that may develop into cancer.

Pap screen testing should begin at age 21. Routine screening is recommended every three years for women 21-65 years old. For women 30 years to 65 years who have a normal Pap test result and negative HPV test, rescreening should be done in five years.

Recommended Related to Menopause

Menopause: Is There Life Beyond Hormone Replacement Therapy?

Menopause gets a bad rap, but there is an upside. A major, essential, glorious one, says Renzie Richardson, a 51-year-old human resources consultant from Cumming, Ga. “I was definitely happy not to have a period anymore. That in itself was a celebration.” Still, the wider ramifications of going through The Change threw her for a loop. “I thought the period was gone -- that was it. But now you’ve got all these other symptoms you have to deal with.” Richardson was taken by surprise by hot flashes,...

Read the Menopause: Is There Life Beyond Hormone Replacement Therapy? article > >

It is your best tool to detect pre-cancerous conditions that may lead to cervical cancer. If detected early, cervical cancer can be cured.

Do I Still Need a Pap Smear Now That I Am Menopausal?

Even if you are menopausal or postmenopausal, you should continue to have Pap tests. Women who have had a total hysterectomy for a noncancerous indication and have not had a previous history of precancerous Pap tests may be able to stop Pap screening depending on your medical history and risk of contacting human papilloma virus (HPV). Screening may also be discontinued at 65 or 70 years of age if women have had at least three normal Pap tests in a row and no abnormal Pap tests in the previous 10 years.

How Often Should I Get a Pap Smear Now That I Am Menopausal?

You may have a Pap test every three years if you have had three normal Pap test results for three years in a row, if you have no past history of a precancerous Pap test result, no HIV infection, no weakened immune system, and no history of in utero exposure to diethystilbestrol. 

Women who have a higher risk of cancer may need a Pap test more often. Your doctor can recommend what is best for you.

Do I Need to Get Pap Smears If I Have Had a Hysterectomy?

Pap smears may be discontinued after a total hysterectomy unless the surgery was performed for cervical pre-invasive or invasive cancer or other uterine cancers, or if you are considered to be at high risk for other reasons; for example, if you are HIV positive (carry the virus that causes AIDS), or have a weakened immune system. In these situations, Pap smears should be continued as determined by your doctor. Women who have had a hysterectomy and no longer need Pap smears should continue to have routine pelvic exams performed by their doctor.

What Symptoms Should I Watch for Between Pap Smears?

Pre-cancerous conditions of the cervix seldom cause symptoms. For problems to be detected, a pelvic examination and a Pap smear are usually required.

When cancer is present in the cervix, the most common symptom is abnormal bleeding. Bleeding may start and stop between regular menstrual periods, or it may occur after sexual intercourse or douching. Abnormal vaginal discharge is another symptom. Pain is NOT an early warning sign of the disease. These symptoms can be caused by other conditions and are not sure signs of cancer; but be sure to see your doctor if any of these symptoms occur.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Nivin Todd, MD, FACOG on June 25, 2012
Next Article:

Today on WebMD

Menopause Overview Slideshow
Slideshow
Screening Tests for Women
Slideshow
 
thumbnail_man_feeding_woman_strawberry
Slideshow
Overweight man sitting on park bench
Video
 
Managing Menopause
Video
Thyroid exam
Quiz
 
Alcohol Disrupting Your Sleep
Article
senior couple
Article
 
Porous bone
Slideshow
woman collapsed over laundry
Quiz
 
Superfood for Bones
Slideshow
Oh Do You Know the Muffin Top
Article
 

WebMD Special Sections