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    Blood Alcohol

    A blood alcohol test measures the amount of alcohol (ethanol) in your body. Alcohol is quickly absorbed into the blood and can be measured within minutes of having an alcoholic drink. The amount of alcohol in the blood reaches its highest level about an hour after drinking. But food in the stomach may increase the amount of time it takes for the blood alcohol to reach its highest level. About 90% of alcohol is broken down in the liver camera.gif. The rest of it is passed out of the body in urine and your exhaled breath.

    Alcohol has a noticeable effect on the body, even when consumed in small amounts. In large amounts, alcohol acts as a sedative and depresses the central nervous system.

    A blood alcohol test is often used to find out whether you are legally drunk or intoxicated. If this test is being done for legal reasons, a consent form may be required, but refusing to take the test may have legal consequences.

    Why It Is Done

    A test for blood alcohol level is done to:

    • Check the amount of alcohol in the blood when a person is suspected of being legally drunk (intoxicated). Symptoms of alcohol intoxication include confusion, lack of coordination, unsteadiness that makes it hard to stand or walk, or erratic or unsafe driving.
    • Find the cause of altered mental status, such as unclear thinking, confusion, or coma.
    • Check to see whether alcohol is present in the blood at times when the consumption of alcohol is prohibited-for example, in underage people suspected of drinking or in people enrolled in an alcohol treatment program.

    How To Prepare

    No special preparation is needed before having a blood alcohol test.

    Many medicines may change the results of this test. Be sure to tell your doctor about all the nonprescription and prescription medicines you take.

    How It Is Done

    The health professional drawing blood will:

    • Wrap an elastic band around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood. This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein.
    • Clean the needle site with a non-alcohol solution such as povidone-iodine or antiseptic soap.
    • Put the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed.
    • Attach a tube to the needle to fill it with blood.
    • Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collected.
    • Put a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removed.
    • Put pressure on the site and then put on a bandage.
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    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: September 09, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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