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Eating Disorders Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Eating Disorders

  1. Anorexia: Help for Family Members - Topic Overview

    One person's struggle with anorexia nervosa affects the entire family. Counseling can be a big help to everyone in your family,whether it means seeing a counselor alone,as a couple,or as a family. Each family member may need reassurance or counseling at different times during the course of the illness. Seek the support you need during this time from all available resources. Use a ...

  2. Eating Disorders: Feeling Better About Yourself - Topic Overview

    People who have eating disorders are often very self-critical. Learning to be easier on yourself is essential. Pace yourself if you are feeling weak. Everything you do may take more time and effort. Do not expect to do all the things you want to do right away. Choose what is most important and do those things first. Break larger tasks into smaller ones and do what you can. Remember that ...

  3. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Eating Disorders

    Cognitive - behavioral therapy is an active type of counseling. Sessions usually are held once a week for as long as you need to master new skills. Individual sessions last 1 hour, and group sessions may be longer. During cognitive - behavioral therapy for anorexia, you learn:About your illness, its symptoms, and how to predict when symptoms will most likely recur.To keep a diary of eating episode

  4. Medical History for Eating Disorders - Topic Overview

    During a medical history evaluation for eating disorders, the doctor will ask you questions about:The amount of food you eat at one time, how often you eat food, what type of food you eat, any particular ways that food needs to be prepared or served, and other eating habits.Diets and weight loss. Your doctor may ask: What types of diets you've used and how many times you've gone on a diet over the past year.Whether you think you should be dieting.How much weight you've lost when dieting.How you feel about your shape and body size.Whether your weight affects how you feel about yourself.How often you think about food throughout the day.Whether you think you are overweight.Monthly menstrual periods. Females who have eating disorders often have irregular menstrual cycles. They often stop (or never start) having their periods.Amount of sexual interest. People with anorexia nervosa often lack interest in sexual activities.The type and amount of exercise you do.Involvement in sports, dance,

  5. Anorexia Complications - Topic Overview

    Almost half of people who have anorexia nervosa will eventually develop symptoms (binge-purge behaviors) of another eating disorder called bulimia nervosa. 1 Long-term or severe anorexia also can cause serious medical complications,such as: 2 Osteoporosis,which results from a lack of calcium in the diet as well as too much cortisol and too little estrogen in the body. The teenage years are ...

  6. Eating Disorders: Cultural and Social Factors - Topic Overview

    Eating disorders occur most often in industrialized cultures where there is an emphasis on thinness,especially if thinness is linked to success. Magazines,television,and other media have created an unrealistic image of the perfect,successful person. The pressure to be thin can lead to intense dieting,even in very young children,which can turn into an eating disorder in people who are more ...

  7. Anorexia Nervosa - Exams and Tests

    By answering these five simple questions, you can see whether you may have an eating disorder.

  8. Bulimia: Misuse of Ipecac Syrup - Topic Overview

    Syrup of ipecac is a medicine that causes vomiting. Its purpose is to empty the stomach after poisoning or drug overdose. It works by irritating the stomach lining until a person vomits. Some people who have bulimia nervosa use ipecac regularly to make themselves vomit. If used too often,ipecac can cause: Diarrhea. Drowsiness. Coughing or choking. Low blood pressure and a rapid heartbeat. ...

  9. Topic Overview

    Some personality traits put a person at greater risk of developing an eating disorder such as anorexia,bulimia,or binge eating. These traits include: 1 Low self-esteem. Difficulty communicating negative emotions,such as anger,sadness,or fear. Difficulty dealing with conflict. A need to please others. Perfectionism or always striving to be the best at whatever he or she does. A need ...

  10. Anorexia Nervosa - What Increases Your Risk

    The risk of developing anorexia nervosa increases if you have a family history of an eating disorder, obesity, or a mood disorder (such as anxiety or depression), have certain personality traits and emotional conditions, such as perfectionism, perseveranc

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