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Alternative Treatments for Migraines and Headaches

Migraines and other types of headaches cause significant productive loss to employers. They are also one of the most common complaints seen in the doctor's office.

Although drug treatments are effective, people suffering from headaches often use a wide spectrum of complementary and alternative treatments.

Recommended Related to Migraines/Headaches

Tyramine and Migraines

In some people, certain foods and drinks -- or components they contain -- can trigger a migraine. One well-accepted migraine trigger is tyramine. Tyramine is a substance found naturally in some foods. It's especially found in aged and fermented foods, such as: Aged cheeses Smoked fish Cured meats Some types of beer Also, foods high in protein may contain more tyramine if: They have been stored for a long time They have not been kept cold enough

Read the Tyramine and Migraines article > >

Chronic stress may contribute to the development of the most common types of headaches, including migraines and tension-type headaches. So it's not surprising that alternative treatments aimed at stress reduction, such as biofeedback and relaxation, are well-studied and considered effective treatments for some patients with headaches. There are additional "nontraditional" headache treatments, including acupuncture, massage, herbs, and diets, of which there are varying degrees of effectiveness.

Biofeedback for Migraines and Headaches

Biofeedback is a technique that can help a headache sufferer learn stress-reduction skills by providing information (feedback) about muscle tension, skin temperature, brain waves, and other vital signs. Small metal sensors, called electrodes, are attached to the skin and measure the amount of muscle tension or the skin temperature. This information is displayed as numbers, electrical waves, or sounds on a screen. For example, a stress response reduces skin temperature because of constriction of blood vessels, while a relaxation response results in dilated blood vessels and warm skin.

The results of several studies show changes in the blood flow in the brain during migraine attacks and in the pain-free periods in between. Using biofeedback training, a person can influence the blood flow to the brain and better manage a headache.

Most studies on biofeedback indicate that it reduces the frequency and duration of headaches, both in children and adults. In general, the effects of biofeedback appear to be comparable to many drugs used for chronic headaches, and can be recommended as early treatment for recurrent migraines.

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