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Osteoporosis Health Center

Soda and Osteoporosis: Is There a Connection?

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Does this sound like you? While everyone else is at Starbucks getting their morning latte, you're at the vending machine picking up a Diet Coke. And if you're going to a movie, the popcorn just wouldn't be complete without a large soda. But there may be a link between soda and osteoporosis that could be putting your bones at risk.

When Soda Displaces Milk

Experts aren't sure why drinking soda is linked to osteoporosis. It may be simply that the soda is displacing healthier drinks in your diet. If you're guzzling a Pepsi with dinner (or breakfast!) you're probably not drinking the glass of milk or fortified orange juice that nutritionists recommend.

"There is an association between people who have high soda intake and risk of fracture, but that's probably due to the fact that if they have a high soda intake, they have a low milk intake," agrees Robert Heaney, MD, FACP, a professor of medicine at Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., and a nationally recognized expert on osteoporosis.

"Those things have been shown to be linked in various studies. But when you look at the ingredients of the soda and give those to healthy people and measure what it does to their calcium composition, nothing happens at all."

"Individuals who drink a lot of soft drinks aren't going to drink as much nutritious liquid as others," says Bess Dawson-Hughes, M.D., professor of medicine and director of the Bone Metabolism Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. "We're simply not going to consume beyond a certain volume each day."

So, if you just remember to drink a glass of milk for every can of Diet Coke, you'll be fine, right? Not necessarily.

Soda and Osteoporosis: The Cola Connection

New research indicates that there may be more to the soda and osteoporosis connection than simply replacing the good stuff with the useless stuff.

Researchers at Tufts University, studying several thousand men and women, found that women who regularly drank cola-based sodas -- three or more a day -- had almost 4% lower bone mineral density in the hip, even though researchers controlled for calcium and vitamin D intake. But women who drank non-cola soft drinks, like Sprite or Mountain Dew, didn't appear to have lower bone density.

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