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    Hip Fracture - Topic Overview

    How is it treated? continued...

    Taking part in a rehab program is very important because it will speed up your recovery and help you to get back to your normal activities sooner.

    After a hip fracture, some people aren't ever able to get around as well as they could before. They may need to use a walker or cane. They may need help with daily activities such as dressing and bathing. And many can no longer live on their own. Work hard to get your strength and mobility back so you can be as independent as possible.

    How can you prevent a hip fracture?

    There are many things you can do to prevent a hip fracture. One of the most important is to prevent osteoporosis. Bone thinning can happen to men or women. But it is more common in women.

    To keep your bones strong:

    • Get plenty of calcium and vitamin D. Dairy foods like milk, cheese, and yogurt have lots of calcium. It's also in some vegetables like broccoli and kale. Vitamin D is in foods such as salmon, tuna, and fortified milk and cereals. If you want to take supplements, ask your doctor how much you need.
    • Limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink a day for women and no more than 2 drinks a day for men.
    • Do weight-bearing exercise that puts pressure on bones and muscles. Walking is a good choice.
    • If your doctor prescribes medicine to slow osteoporosis, take it as directed.
    • Don't smoke.

    You also need to be extra careful to prevent falls. Here are a few ways to make your home safer:

    • Keep walkways clear of electrical cords and clutter.
    • Be sure you have good lighting where you are walking.
    • Put grab bars and non-slip mats in showers and tubs.

    It can also help to:

    • Get your eyes checked on a regular basis.
    • Exercise to help keep your strength and balance.
    • Take medicines as directed. And from time to time, ask your primary care doctor to review your medicines. Some medicines, such as sleeping pills or pain relievers, can increase your risk of falling.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: June 04, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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