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    Coping With a Life-Threatening Illness

    Palliative Care: Improving Life for Patients and Caregivers
    (continued)

    Coping With Anxiety continued...

    You can also take your mind off your anxiety by finding time to do the things you love, things that you might not have been able to do when focused intently on a cure.

    "One of the burdens of curative treatment is it often takes a lot of time," says Daly. "You go to the doctor's office, come home and rest, go to the infusion center, come home and rest, go to a specialist, come home and rest. That's OK, but it's a burden of treatment. Use the freedom you have from that burden to enjoy yourself. Be critical about how you're spending your time, because time is precious."

    Coping With Pain

    The first thing you need to know about pain is that it can be treated.

    "There shouldn't be the expectation that you have to live with it," says Morrison. "In fact, there's data showing that untreated pain will lessen your ability to function and may even shorten your life, so it's important to treat it early."

    Some things you should know about pain management in palliative care:

    • Treating your pain early doesn't mean that treatments will not be effective later.
    • Treating pain does not lessen your ability to recognize if a therapy is working or if your disease is advancing. "Pain should not be used as a marker for whether or not a treatment is working," says Morrison.
    • You are not likely to become addicted to pain medication. "And if you do have such a history, we can manage that as well. Just because you have that history doesn't mean you need to suffer. You just need more specialized care," Morrison says.
    • Side effects of pain medication can be managed too. "Constipation, nausea, and cognitive changes can be side effects of pain medication," says Morrison. "But we can treat those too. Nobody should be in pain because of fear of medication side effects."

    To manage pain effectively, your doctor has to know as much as possible about what you're experiencing.

    "Try to report your pain as accurately as you can. There's no reason to minimize it or to try to appear stronger about it," says Daly. "Describe what it feels like, where it's located, what makes it worse, and what makes it better. Be prepared to tell your physician anything you've already tried for the symptom, in as much detail as you can."

    That's your starting point. Then, as you go forward, keep track of how the treatments affect your pain. When do you need to use it? Does it help you a lot or only a little? What are the side effects? Is it helping you reach your goals, like working in the garden or going out with friends?

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