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Palliative Care Center

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How to Get Pediatric Palliative Care

It can sometimes be terrifying for parents when a pediatrician suggests a consultation with the palliative care team. If parents believe the term "palliative care" to be a synonym for "end-of-life care," they may hesitate to welcome a consultation.

In fact, pediatric palliative care, also known as pediatric advanced care (PAC), is not limited to end-of-life care. PAC teams offer a host of support services to families of children at any phase of a chronic or life-limiting condition. Sometimes, children may get well and families no longer need the service. But just how beneficial palliative care can be is not always appreciated.

Getting a Referral

If parents want to meet with a palliative care team, they should ask their primary pediatrician for a referral. They may also ask hospital administrators if palliative care is available.

Many times, palliative care programs are not easily visible in the hospital, so families need to ask if they exist. Even primary pediatricians may not always think of the PAC team right away. Families may need to be proactive.

Accepting palliative care is not an indication that doctors have given up on treatment or finding a cure. Palliative care services are often administered to children along with curative treatments, not instead of them. The services provide families and patients with the support and comfort they need to get through intensive treatments and hospital stays.

Doctors often recommend a consultation with the PAC team at the initial diagnosis of a chronic or life-limiting condition. The PAC team can best meet a family's needs if it is brought in early and can work with the family throughout the course of the illness.

If palliative care services are not recommended at diagnosis, a doctor may recommend them, or parents can request them, if one of the following occurs:

  • A first treatment is unsuccessful
  • Symptoms worsen or prior symptoms recur
  • Parents are being asked to make increasingly difficult decisions
  • Parents feel they need additional support

 

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