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Acne - What Happens

Acne develops most often in the teen and young adult years. During this time, both males and females usually produce more testosterone than at any other time in life. This hormone causes oil glands to produce more oil (sebum). The extra oil can clog pores and cause acne. Bacteria can grow in this mixture. And if the mixture leaks into nearby tissues, it causes swelling, redness, and pus (pimples).

Acne usually gets better in the adult years when your body produces less testosterone. Still, some women have premenstrual acne flare-ups well into adulthood.

Recommended Related to Acne

Understanding Acne Symptoms

  The symptoms of acne are: Persistent, recurrent red spots or swelling on the skin, generally known as pimples; the swelling may become inflamed and fill with pus. They typically appear on the face, chest, shoulders, neck, or upper portion of the back. Dark spots with open pores at the center (blackheads) Tiny white bumps under the skin that have no obvious opening (whiteheads) Red swellings or lumps (known as papules) that are visibly filled with pus Nodules or...

Read the Understanding Acne Symptoms article > >

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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: January 23, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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