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    Warts: Treatments and Home Remedies

    Skin warts are common, and there are many treatments. If home remedies for warts don't work, you can try over-the-counter wart removers. If your warts still don't disappear, you can turn to treatment by a doctor, who can freeze or cut off the wart.

    Here are some home remedies and treatments for common warts, such as plantar warts on the soles of the feet or palmar warts on the hands. For the most part, these remedies do not work very often.

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    Home Remedies for Warts

    People try countless home remedies for warts, but most do not help. They rub warts with garlic, or apply a paste made of baking powder and castor oil. They crush vitamin C tablets into a paste to cover the wart. They even soak warts in pineapple juice. Prolonged application of duct tape also has its fans, although evidence does not support its use.

    Over-the-Counter Wart Removers

    Most dermatologists say it’s safe to try drugstore wart removers -- as long as you’ve confirmed that it’s really a wart. Sometimes calluses or corns are mistaken for warts. If in doubt, ask your doctor.

    Many over-the-counter wart treatments contain salicylic acid. The success rate is about 50% over 6 weeks or so. Other treatments work by "freezing" the wart. After two or three treatments, each lasting about 10 days, the success rate is about 40% to 50%.

    Over-the-counter treatments aren't recommended for common warts on the face or lips and should not be used on genital warts. See your doctor about treatments for those warts.

    Warts Treatments From a Doctor or Dermatologist

    If you go to a doctor, you can choose from many wart treatments. Some focus on destroying the wart and others on boosting your immune system so your body clears the wart. Among the options:

    • Liquid nitrogen to freeze the wart off
    • Prescription-strength salicylic acid applied at home to get rid of the wart
    • Laser or surgery to cut the wart off
    • Topical immune system stimulants such as squaric acid, which is applied to the skin for several weeks to help fight the virus that causes the wart

    Immune therapy for warts can take 6 to 12 weeks to work. Removing warts with a laser or surgery is the fastest treatment, but is also the most expensive and invasive.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by David T. Derrer, MD on January 31, 2015

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