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Nicotine Craving May Be Temporarily Eased by This

Early study tested the noninvasive treatment on smokers

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Amy Norton

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Noninvasive stimulation of an area of the brain linked to addiction seems to temporarily ease smokers' cravings for nicotine, a preliminary study finds.

The technique, called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), is already approved in the United States as a treatment for major depression. In the new study, reported in a recent issue of the journal Biological Psychiatry, researchers tested the effects of the treatment on 16 smokers' craving for nicotine.

They found that in general, the smokers were yearning for nicotine after seeing tempting images -- like a person lighting a cigarette. But after 15 minutes of transcranial magnetic stimulation, that craving dipped by almost 30 percent, on average.

But whether brain stimulation could boost smokers' willpower, or ultimately help them quit, is anybody's guess.

"This is just a pilot study," said lead researcher Dr. Xingbao Li, an assistant professor at the Medical University of South Carolina, in Charleston. "There's still a long way left to go."

During TMS, an electromagnetic coil is placed on the scalp to create electric currents that stimulate cells in a specific area of the brain. The therapy is approved for hard-to-treat cases of depression that do not improve with standard treatments, like antidepressants and talk therapy.

Experts think it works by boosting levels of mood-regulating chemicals like dopamine. That may also be what's happening when it comes to nicotine craving, Li explained, since dopamine levels dip when people are in withdrawal from a drug.

But that's speculation for now, he said.

Another researcher who studies tobacco dependence said the findings, while early, are "quite exciting."

If further research supports it, transcranial magnetic stimulation could be one more tool in the smoking-cessation toolbox, according to Christine Sheffer, an associate medical professor of community health and social medicine at the City College of New York.

Sheffer said she could foresee TMS being an option for smokers, to be used along with behavioral counseling. "I think it is important to stress that it is unlikely that any form of brain stimulation -- or any treatment for that matter -- is going to affect cessation without behavioral treatment," Sheffer said.

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