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    How to Quit Smoking

    You're ready to kick the habit. That's great!

    There are different ways to quit smoking. Some work better than others. The best plan is the one you can stick with. Consider which of these would work for you:

    1. Cold turkey (no outside help). About 90% of people who try to quit smoking do it without outside support -- no aids, therapy, or medicine. Although most people try to quit this way, it's not the most effective and successful method. Only between 4% to 7% are able to quit by going cold turkey alone.

    2. Build a quit plan. Pick a quit date that gives you time to prepare without losing your motivation to quit. Tell friends and family that you are quitting. Remove cigarettes and ashtrays from your home, work, and car. Identify smoking triggers, and decide how you are going to deal with them.

    3. Behavioral therapy. You'll work with a counselor to find ways not to smoke. Together, you'll find your triggers (such as emotions or situations that make you want to smoke) and make a plan to get through cravings.

    4. Nicotine replacement therapy. Nicotine gum, patches, inhalers, sprays, and lozenges are nicotine replacement therapies. They work by giving you nicotine without using tobacco. You may be more likely to quit smoking if you use nicotine replacement therapy. If you're younger than 18, you need to get your doctor's permission to use it. This plan works best when you also get behavioral therapy and lots of support from friends and family.

    5. Medicine. Buproprion (Zyban) and varenicline (Chantix) are intended to help people quit smoking. Your doctor must prescribe these medications.

    6. Combo treatments. Using a combination of treatment methods may raise your chances of quitting. For example, using both a nicotine patch and gum may be better than a patch alone. Other proven combos include behavioral therapy and nicotine replacement therapy, prescription medication with a nicotine patch, and nicotine patch and nicotine spray. The FDA has not yet approved using two types of nicotine replacement therapy at the same time, so be sure to talk with your doctor first to see if this is the right approach for you.

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