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TERMINALIA

Other Names:

Amandier Indien, Amandier Tropical, Arjan des Indes, Arjuna, Axjun Argun, Badamier, Badamier Géant, Baheda, Bahera, Bala Harade, Balera, Behada, Beleric Myrobalan, Belleric Myrobalan, Belliric Myrobalan, Bhibitaki, Bibhitak, Bibitaki, Carambole ...
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TERMINALIA Overview
TERMINALIA Uses
TERMINALIA Side Effects
TERMINALIA Interactions
TERMINALIA Dosing
TERMINALIA Overview Information

Terminalia is a tree. Three species of terminalia are used for medicine. These species are Terminalia arjuna, Terminalia bellerica, and Terminalia chebula.

In traditional Ayurvedic medicine, Terminalia arjuna has been used to balance the three “humors”: kapha, pitta, and vata. It has also been used for asthma, bile duct disorders, scorpion stings, and poisonings.

The bark of Terminalia arjuna has been used in India for more than 3000 years, primarily as a heart remedy. An Indian physician named Vagbhata has been credited as the first to use this product for heart conditions in the seventh century A.D. Research on terminalia has been going on since the 1930s, but studies have provided mixed results. Its role, if any, in heart disease still remains uncertain.

Nevertheless, people today use Terminalia arjuna for disorders of the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular disease), including heart disease and related chest pain, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. It is also used as “a water pill,” and for earaches, dysentery, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), diseases of the urinary tract, and to increase sexual desire.

Terminalia bellerica and Terminalia chebula are both used for high cholesterol and digestive disorders, including both diarrhea and constipation, and indigestion. They have also been used for HIV infection.

Terminalia bellerica is used to protect the liver and to treat respiratory conditions, including respiratory tract infections, cough, and sore throat.

Terminalia chebula is used for dysentery.

Terminalia bellerica and Terminalia chebula are used as a lotion for sore eyes.

Terminalia chebula is also used topically as a mouthwash and gargle.

Intravaginally, Terminalia chebula is used as a douche for treating vaginal infections.

In traditional Ayurvedic medicine, Terminalia bellerica has been used as a "health-harmonizer" in combination with Terminalia chebula and Emblica officinalis. This combination is also used to lower cholesterol and to prevent death of heart tissue.

How does it work?

Terminalia contains ingredients that help stimulate the heart. It might also help the heart by lowering cholesterol and blood pressure.

TERMINALIA Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

Large-scale, long-term trials are needed to clarify any role terminalia might have in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.


Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Earaches.
  • HIV infection.
  • Lung conditions.
  • Severe diarrhea.
  • Urinary problems.
  • Water retention.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of terminalia for these uses.


TERMINALIA Side Effects & Safety

Terminalia arjuna is POSSIBLY SAFE when used short-term (for three months or less). But don’t use it without medical supervision. It might affect your heart.

Not enough is known about the safety of Terminalia bellerica and Terminalia chebula. It’s best to avoid use until more is known.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is some evidence that Terminalia arjuna is POSSIBLY UNSAFE during pregnancy. The safety of the other two species during pregnancy is unknown. It’s best to avoid using any terminalia species.

There isn’t enough information about the safety of terminalia during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

TERMINALIA Interactions What is this?

We currently have no information for TERMINALIA Interactions

TERMINALIA Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For treating chest pain after a heart attack along with conventional treatments: 500 mg of the powdered bark of Terminalia arjuna every 8 hours daily.
  • For congestive heart failure: 500 mg of the powdered bark of Terminalia arjuna every 8 hours daily.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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