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SAFFLOWER

Other Names:

Alazor, American Saffron, Bastard Saffron, Benibana, Benibana Oil, Benibana Flower, Cártamo, Carthame, Carthame des Teinturiers, Carthamus tinctorius, Chardon Panaché, Dyer's Saffron, Fake Saffron, False Saffron, Hing Hua, Honghua, Huile de Cart...
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SAFFLOWER Overview
SAFFLOWER Uses
SAFFLOWER Side Effects
SAFFLOWER Interactions
SAFFLOWER Dosing
SAFFLOWER Overview Information

Safflower is a plant. The flower and oil from the seeds are used as medicine.

Safflower seed oil is used for preventing heart disease, including “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis) and stroke. It is also used to treat fever, tumors, coughs, breathing problems, clotting conditions, pain, heart disease, chest pain, and traumatic injuries. Some people use it for inducing sweating; and as a laxative, stimulant, antiperspirant, and expectorant to help loosen phlegm.

Women sometimes use safflower oil for absent or painful menstrual periods; they use safflower flower to cause an abortion.

In foods, safflower seed oil is used as a cooking oil.

In manufacturing, safflower flower is used to color cosmetics and dye fabrics. Safflower seed oil is used as a paint solvent.

How does it work?

The linolenic and linoleic acids in safflower seed oil might help prevent “hardening of the arteries,” lower cholesterol, and reduce the risk of heart disease. Safflower contains chemicals that may thin the blood to prevent clots, widen blood vessels, lower blood pressure, and stimulate the heart.

SAFFLOWER Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • High cholesterol. Some research suggests that taking safflower oil as a dietary supplement or substituting it for other oils in the diet helps lower total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol. However, it does not seem to lower other blood fats called triglycerides or raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol.

Possibly Ineffective for:

  • Low birth weight. Some research suggests that adding a specific safflower oil product (Safola by Marico Industries Ltd.) to infant formula or breast milk does not improve weight gain or skin thickness in low birth weight infants.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Cystic fibrosis. Early research shows that taking safflower oil by mouth for one year does not improve test markers or severity of cystic fibrosis in children.
  • Diabetes. Early research shows that taking safflower oil by mouth for 3 weeks can increase bloodglucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Safflower oil does not seem to affect insulin levels or insulin sensitivity.
  • High cholesterol that is passed down through families (familial hypercholesterolemia). Evidence about the effects of safflower oil in treating high cholesterol that is passed down through families is conflicting. Some early research suggests that replacing dietary butter with safflower oil decrease “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in people with this condition. Other research shows no beneficial effects.
  • Hepatitis C. Early research suggests that taking a specific product containing safflower, pumpkin seeds, plantain seeds, and Japanese honeysuckle (EH0202) by mouth for 3 months reduces general discomfort, bloating, nausea, and vomiting in people with hepatitis C. However, the amount of hepatitis C virus present in the body does not appear to be affected.
  • High blood pressure. Evidence about the effects of safflower oil on blood pressure is conflicting. Some early research suggests that taking safflower oil by mouth for 6-8 weeks lowers blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. However, other evidence suggests that taking safflower oil is not effective for lowering blood pressure.
  • A scaly skin condition (phrynoderma). Early research suggests that taking safflower oil containing vitamin E and linoleic acid by mouth for more than 8 weeks can improve skin dryness and roughness in people with phrynoderma.
  • Fever.
  • Tumors.
  • Coughs.
  • Breathing problems (conditions that affect the breathing tubes called bronchial tubes).
  • Blood circulation disorders.
  • Pain.
  • Menstrual disorders.
  • Chest pain.
  • Traumatic injuries.
  • Constipation.
  • Abortions.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of safflower for these uses.


SAFFLOWER Side Effects & Safety

Safflower seed oil is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth.

It is POSSIBLY SAFE to take safflower flower by mouth or to inject a specific safflower oil emulsion (Liposyn) intravenously (by IV), provided the safflower oil emulsion is administered by a healthcare professional.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: It is POSSIBLY SAFE to inject a specific safflower oil emulsion (Liposyn) intravenously (by IV), provided the safflower oil emulsion is administered to children by a healthcare professional.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Safflower seed oil is POSSIBLY SAFE to take by mouth during pregnancy. But don’t take safflower flower during pregnancy. It is LIKELY UNSAFE. It can bring on menstrual periods, make the uterus contract, and cause miscarriages.

There isn’t much information about the safety of using safflower seed oil or flower during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding problems (hemorrhagic diseases, stomach or intestinal ulcers, or clotting disorders): Safflower can slow blood clotting. If you have any kind of bleeding problem, don’t use safflower.

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Safflower may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking safflower.

Diabetes: Safflower oil might increase blood sugar. There is concern that safflower oil might interfere with blood sugar control in people with diabetes.

Surgery: Since safflower might slow blood clotting, there is a concern that it could increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using safflower at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

SAFFLOWER Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with SAFFLOWER

    Large amounts of safflower might slow blood clotting. Taking safflower along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.


SAFFLOWER Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For high cholesterol: Safflower oil as a dietary supplement.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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