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What do the results of a uric acid blood test mean?

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The test tells you how much uric acid is in your blood.

A normal range depends on the lab the testing's done at, so check with your doctor to help you understand your results. You usually get them in 1-2 days, but it depends on your lab.

Generally, your uric acid level is high when:

  • For females, it’s over 6 mg/dL
  • For males, it’s over 7 mg/dL

High levels could be a sign of many conditions, including gout, kidney disease, and cancer. But it could be higher than normal because you eat foods with a lot of purines. That includes dried beans or certain fish such as anchovies, mackerel, and sardines.

Usually, your doctor will order other tests at the same time to track down what’s causing your symptoms. Your doctor will then help you understand what all your results mean and what your next steps are.

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Uric Acid (Blood).”

KidsHealth: “Blood Test: Uric Acid.”

Lab Test Online: “Uric Acid, “Kidney Stone Analysis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Gout.”

NIH, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention.”

Scripps: “Uric Acid: Blood.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on February 16, 2019

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Uric Acid (Blood).”

KidsHealth: “Blood Test: Uric Acid.”

Lab Test Online: “Uric Acid, “Kidney Stone Analysis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Gout.”

NIH, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention.”

Scripps: “Uric Acid: Blood.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on February 16, 2019

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What other tests might I need in addition to a uric acid blood test?

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