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Why would I need a uric acid blood test?

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Your doctor can use this test to help find out if you have:

Gout. This is a form of arthritis where crystals from uric acid form in your joints and cause intense pain. You often feel it in your big toe.

Kidney stones. These are little, hard masses -- like small stones -- that form in your kidneys when you have too much uric acid. They may cause severe pain in your lower back that comes and goes, blood in your urine, throwing up, upset stomach, and an urgent need to pee.

High uric acid level during chemo or radiation. These treatments kill a lot of cells in your body, which can raise the level of uric acid. The test is used to check and make sure your level doesn’t get too high.

From: What is a Uric Acid Blood Test? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Uric Acid (Blood).”

KidsHealth: “Blood Test: Uric Acid.”

Lab Test Online: “Uric Acid, “Kidney Stone Analysis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Gout.”

NIH, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention.”

Scripps: “Uric Acid: Blood.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on January 27, 2017

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Uric Acid (Blood).”

KidsHealth: “Blood Test: Uric Acid.”

Lab Test Online: “Uric Acid, “Kidney Stone Analysis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Gout.”

NIH, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention.”

Scripps: “Uric Acid: Blood.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on January 27, 2017

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How do I get ready for a uric acid blood test?

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