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How much vitamin B12 do you need to get when you're pregnant?

ANSWER

Pregnant women need 2.6 micrograms per day of vitamin B12. Good food sources include clams, mussels, crab, salmon, skim milk, beef, chicken, and turkey. It is also added to some breakfast cereals. Your body needs vitamin B12 to keep your blood cells and nerve cells working properly. Vitamin B12 also helps prevent megaloblastic anemia, which can make you feel weak and tired.

SOURCES:

Linus Pauling Institute: Micronutrient Information Center: "Choline." "Essential Fatty Acids." "Potassium." "Riboflavin." "Vitamin B6." "Vitamin B12." "Vitamin C." "Vitamin D." "Zinc."

March of Dimes: "Omega-3 Fatty Acids During Pregnancy."

National Institutes of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements: "Vitamin B6." "Vitamin B12." "Vitamin C." "Vitamin D." Zinc."

National Library of Medicine: MedlinePlus: "Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)."

United States Department of Agriculture: "DRI Report—Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline: Chapter 12."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on July 02, 2018

SOURCES:

Linus Pauling Institute: Micronutrient Information Center: "Choline." "Essential Fatty Acids." "Potassium." "Riboflavin." "Vitamin B6." "Vitamin B12." "Vitamin C." "Vitamin D." "Zinc."

March of Dimes: "Omega-3 Fatty Acids During Pregnancy."

National Institutes of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements: "Vitamin B6." "Vitamin B12." "Vitamin C." "Vitamin D." Zinc."

National Library of Medicine: MedlinePlus: "Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)."

United States Department of Agriculture: "DRI Report—Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline: Chapter 12."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on July 02, 2018

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How much vitamin C do you need when you're pregnant?

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