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Can chronic constipation cause hemorrhoids?

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Having constipation every once in a while is common, but if you’re dealing with symptoms for more than 3 months, that raises your chance of having complications.

When you’re constipated, you’re more likely to push hard to try to go. That can make the veins around your rectum and anus swell. These swollen veins are called hemorrhoids, or piles. They’re like varicose veins around your anus.

Hemorrhoids can itch and hurt. You may see streaks of blood on your toilet paper when you wipe. Sometimes blood can pool inside a hemorrhoid, which can cause a painful, hard lump. You may also get skin tags, blood clots, or infections from your hemorrhoids.

SOURCES:

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Definition and facts of constipation,” “Definition and facts of hemorrhoids.”

Mayo Clinic: “Constipation,” “Hemorrhoids,” “Anal fissure.”

UCSF Medical Center: “Constipation Signs and Symptoms.”

The American Gastroenterological Association: “Understanding Constipation.”

Harvard Medical School: “Constipation and impaction.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Rectal Prolapse.”

Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology: “What is chronic constipation? Definition and diagnosis.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on January 31, 2019

SOURCES:

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Definition and facts of constipation,” “Definition and facts of hemorrhoids.”

Mayo Clinic: “Constipation,” “Hemorrhoids,” “Anal fissure.”

UCSF Medical Center: “Constipation Signs and Symptoms.”

The American Gastroenterological Association: “Understanding Constipation.”

Harvard Medical School: “Constipation and impaction.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Rectal Prolapse.”

Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology: “What is chronic constipation? Definition and diagnosis.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on January 31, 2019

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What can hemorrhoids from constipation cause?

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