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  • Question 1/8

    Where does the digestive process end?

  • Answer 1/8

    Where does the digestive process end?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Digestion starts in your mouth, as soon as you take a bite of something. The food you chew and swallow passes into your esophagus, then into your stomach. Next, the grub heads into your small intestine, where nutrients get absorbed through its walls. What's left moves into the large intestine and is eventually turned into poop.

  • Answer 1/8

    Which is longer?

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    • Correct Answer:

    They're both part of the same tube, but the so-called "small" section is much longer. It'd be more than 20 feet long if you unraveled it, while the large intestine would be about 5 feet long. The names have to do with the width rather than the length. The small intestine is narrower.

  • Question 1/8

    Which animal has no stomach?

  • Answer 1/8

    Which animal has no stomach?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Weird but true. This animal simply has a slight swelling where the esophagus connects to the intestine.

  • Question 1/8

    Peptic ulcers can be caused by:

  • Answer 1/8

    Peptic ulcers can be caused by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While stress, spicy food, and other things can make ulcers worse, they don't cause them. Bacteria's often to blame for these sores on the lining of the stomach or on part of the small intestine called the duodenum. It damages the mucus that coats and protects the stomach, allowing acid to eat through. Another common culprit: using NSAID medications like aspirin and ibuprofen for a long time.

  • Question 1/8

    What role does your gallbladder play in digestion?

  • Answer 1/8

    What role does your gallbladder play in digestion?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your stomach and intestines might get all the attention, but your gallbladder plays a crucial role, too. It holds bile, which helps digest fats. It’s your liver's job to help rid your body of toxins.

  • Answer 1/8

    You get heartburn when:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Muscles at the bottom of your esophagus are supposed to stop this. But sometimes they weaken or relax, and acid flows up. That's why you can get a painful, burning sensation in your chest.

  • Question 1/8

    What makes the enzyme that breaks down carbs?

  • Answer 1/8

    What makes the enzyme that breaks down carbs?

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    • Correct Answer:

    It's called amylase, and it turns carbs into sugar your body can absorb and use for energy. Your pancreas also makes enzymes to help break down fats and proteins.

  • Question 1/8

    Nutrients from food move through your body via:

  • Answer 1/8

    Nutrients from food move through your body via:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    After you digest a meal or snack, its nutrients get absorbed through the walls of your small intestine. From there, sugars, amino acids, glycerol, and some vitamins and salts get carried through your bloodstream. But your lymphatic system -- vessels that have white blood cells and lymph fluid -- does its part by absorbing fatty acids and vitamins.

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Sources | Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on June 25, 2018 Medically Reviewed on June 25, 2018

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on
June 25, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Wanchanta / Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh: "About the Small and Large Intestines."

Colorado State University: "Gross and Microscopic Anatomy of the Stomach," "Overview of Gastrointestinal Hormones."

Coyne, J. "Why Evolution is True." (Viking Adult, 2009).

Hormone Health Network: "What Are Hormones, and What Do They Do?"

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "The Brain-Gut Connection."

KidsHealth.org: "Your Digestive System."

Mayo Clinic: "GERD."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Peptic Ulcer Disease and NSAIDs,” "Your Digestive System and How it Works."

Pancreatic Cancer Action Network: "Pancreatic Enzymes."

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